Spartans fall late at Paradise, 21-17

first_img“I’m proud of how our … Paradise >> The head coaching era of Orlyn Culp for the Red Bluff High football team began on fire Friday night at Paradise. At least for the first 24 minutes. Up 10-0 at halftime on the road against the reigning Northern Section Division II runner-up and perennial power Paradise, Red Bluff couldn’t quite see it all the way through, falling to the Bobcats, 21-17 in a non-league contest. Red Bluff (0-1) continues its season-long road trip at Shasta next week. last_img read more

Turkey costs up for Thanksgiving

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Consumers can expect below normal increases in the price of food for Thanksgiving dinner this year, with one exception: turkey.Corinne Alexander, a Purdue University agricultural economist who follows food prices, said there has been only an 0.8% increase in grocery prices from September 2014 to September of this year. She attributes the slight increase to ample grain inventories and an expansion in livestock production.But she expects turkey prices to be about 15-20% higher than last year.“This price increase is much larger than typical as a result of the avian influenza outbreak that affected turkey flocks earlier this year,” Alexander said.The U.S. Department of Agriculture predicts wholesale prices for Eastern market whole turkey to be between $1.31 and $1.37 per pound the last three months of this year, compared with $1.14 last year.Alexander said the actual prices consumers will pay will vary. Affecting prices will be the differences between frozen and fresh turkeys, organic and nonorganic, brand names and the value of store coupons and price specials.Grocery stores often price Turkey as a “loss leader,” and many will feature turkeys at special prices for frequent shoppers or if they buy larger birds, Alexander said.Other staples of the Thanksgiving dinner will be easier on the wallet. With cranberry producers expecting a good crop, Alexander said the price of that side dish will remain about the same as last year. She added that there will be adequate supplies of white potatoes and sweet potatoes, meaning those food items are not expected to increase in price, either.On average, Americans spend about 10% of their incomes on food. Many families, however, find their budgets tightened by unemployment, minimal wage increases and inflation’s continued erosion of fixed incomes.“For these families, any food price rise is significant,” Alexander said. “We should remember those who are less fortunate and share our food bounty.”Alexander also said energy prices such as electricity and natural gas are unchanged or even lower than last year, so it will cost less to cook Thanksgiving dinner.She also noted that gasoline prices are down nearly 30% compared with last year. That means consumers will spend less to travel this holiday.last_img read more

Sunil Dutt’s letter nails PMO’s lie on Kalmadi appointment

first_imgFormer CWG OC Suresh KalmadiThe government is blaming the previous NDA government for appointment of Suresh Kalmadi as the CWG Organising Committee (OC) chairman, but a letter by a former UPA minister shows the government is clearly in denial.Headlines Today has got proof that a Group of Ministers (GoM) decided to appoint then Union Minister of Sports and Youth Affairs Sunil Dutt as the head of the OC on October 25, 2004.Prime Minister Manmohan Singh too was part of the GoM. The decision was later altered to make Suresh Kalmadi as the chief of the Organising Committee.Headlines Today is in possession of the letter, dated November 14, 2004, which was shot off by the late Sunil Dutt to the prime minister.In the letter, Sunil Dutt clearly states that after the decision to amend the GoM’s decision and make Kalmadi the OC chief, the minutes of the meeting needed to be amended.The decision to make Kalmadi and not the sports minister chief of the CWG working committee proved to be disastrous. Kalmadi and his close associates had a free run, allegedly looting the state’s exchequer.last_img read more

Cypriot Marios Lefkaritis seeking to retain his UEFA position

first_imgNYON.  SWITZERLAND. UEFA says Poland great Zbigniew Boniek is among 13 candidates running for a place on its executive committee.The former Juventus player, who has been president of the Polish soccer federation since 2012, is chasing one of eight seats.Three men are seeking to retain their positions: former presidential candidate Michael van Praag (Netherlands), David Gill (England) and Marios Lefkaritis (Cyprus).Federation presidents seeking election include: Reinhard Grindel (Germany), Armand Duka (Albania) and Karl-Erik Nilsson (Sweden).Federation CEOs standing are: Michele Uva (Italy), Elkhan Mammadov (Azerbaijan) and John Delaney (Ireland).Kazakhstan businessman Kairat Boranbayev, plus soccer officials Kieran O’Connor (Wales) and Servet Yardimci (Turkey), complete the list.The election is set for April 5 at UEFA’s annual congress in Helsinki, Finland.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Foster Parents Opening Their Hearts to Jamaica’s Children

first_img A prospective foster parent must be prepared to go through training Story Highlights Jamaica’s foster parents are opening their homes and hearts to hundreds of children, who are in need of care and protection.They are providing a safe haven for children, who sometimes face extremely difficult circumstances within their own families. These include children, who have been abused, orphaned, abandoned, neglected or who cannot be cared for by their parents or relatives and who might have been placed in a children’s home.Team leader at the Child Development Agency (CDA), Robert Williams, tells JIS News that the CDA, which is responsible for providing support to children in need of care and protection, has been supervising fostering relationships between parents and approximately 950 children in foster homes across the island.Foster care is a legal process that allows a person, who is not the biological parent, to raise and provide a nurturing environment for a child’s physical, spiritual and emotional growth and development.Mr. Williams says that getting children into a nurturing home is one of the top priorities of the CDA. “We want to get the children out of the facilities into a home environment. The home is the preferred place for a child. We seek to put emphasis on that,” he says.He notes that some Jamaicans are willing to foster but “what we would like to see is definitely an increase; we want to see more persons becoming foster parents.”According to Mr. Williams, being a foster parent demands a high level of commitment and the ability to demonstrate love and willingness to care for a child with the same love, care and respect with which a person would treat a biological child.“We are looking for people, who fit the profile of somebody, who can offer care and guidance and love to a child,” he adds.A prospective foster parent must be prepared to go through a period of training in child rearing and satisfy the expectations of the CDA before their applications could be approved.The training sessions, Mr. Williams informs, expose foster parents to policies and procedures of foster care as well as information on human growth and the various stages of a child’s development.For those fostering adolescents, topics such as human sexuality are also addressed. “We want them to understand the characteristics of teenagers and how to deal and cope with that,” Mr. Williams informs.Additionally, he says that children’s officers in various parishes are required to conduct regular home visits to see to the children’s well being. Students from universities engaged in work study practice in child care and development also participate in the home visits.Mr. Williams tells JIS News that children’s officers are also expected to arrange fun time for foster children.“From time to time, the children’s officers (doing the case management) try to get the children together. They go on excursions and at some stage in the process, we seek sponsorship from corporate Jamaica and take them to different places,” he says.Mr. Williams says the CDA directorate meets with foster parents associations from time to time to hear their grievances and concerns.One such group is the Kingston and St. Andrew Foster Parent Association. Its President is Shari Tomlinson, who initiated the rebirth of the association in 2012, which had become dormant after some five years of existence.“We currently have an executive board. We have our mission and vision statement. We are developing our policies as it relates to it being an organisation that will now provide not only social support but also tangible support for our parents,” she tells JIS News.She notes that “a lot of our parents are in need of real support as it relates to financial factors. Whether it is clothes or goods, whether it is cash, whether it is in kind; the association is looking to offer something more to the parents.”Mrs. Tomlinson says the association has written to CDA and the Ministry of Youth and Culture, outlining how it could assist the CDA in dealing with some of the issues being faced by foster parents.“We have had dialogue with the CDA’s management team and they have looked at some of the things that really are an issue for us as foster parents, and we have also looked at how we can assist the CDA in putting in place some of the things that we deem very necessary,” she tells JIS News.Outlining ways the association can help, she mentioned on-going training for foster parents, in addition to the introductory training by the CDA, to deal with some of the issues that arise during foster care.She notes that for some children, it is traumatic moving to a strange surrounding and to people they do not know.“A lot of times, children cannot be integrated very easily into a family because they do have issues, and the issues that they bring to the table are things that we as foster parents must deal with, or the placement will breakdown and then the child goes back into care,” she points out.The President says the association is looking to organise a parenting seminar in August. “We really want to do this because we believe that not only foster parents, but parents in general, are having serious challenges with our children for many reasons and we want to see how best we can address some of these issues, particularly for parents of those children who have emotional and psychological challenges,” she informs.Mrs. Tomlinson tells JIS News that despite the challenges, the foster parents are committed to the care and development of the children in their charge, and they feel a sense of satisfaction when foster children turn out to be successful citizens.“Any child that you have taken from the system and have made a difference in their lives, once the child becomes self-sufficient it is a success story,” she says.“Like any parent you are very proud, you applaud the child, you feel that here is somebody who, despite the odds, has been resilient enough to make the best use of all that they have been given,” she states. Approximately 950 children in foster homes across the island Getting children into a nurturing home is one of the top priorities of the CDAlast_img read more

Parting with the peacocks Saskatoon zoo moves birds for ethical reasons

first_imgSASKATOON – There are no more peacocks at Saskatoon’s Forestry Farm Park and Zoo following a decision to move them somewhere better equipped to house them year-round.Manager Tim Sinclair-Smith says it was an ethical decision based on what happens when the birds aren’t allowed outside.Sinclair-Smith says the peacocks roamed around in the summer, but were locked in cages for up to seven months in the winter.He says the zoo would have had to spend $500,000 to build a winter facility.Officials chose instead to move the birds in the early spring to facilities with better housing such as zoos in Calgary and Toronto.Sinclair-Smith says it was felt the money could be better spent improving the zoo’s habitats for endangered species.(CKOM)last_img read more

ExBC health minister says pot promising substitute for opioid addiction

first_imgVANCOUVER – Terry Lake, the former British Columbia health minister who oversaw the declaration of a public-health emergency amid the deadly fentanyl crisis, is urging more research on the effects of marijuana on opioid addictions.Now a vice-president at a medical cannabis company, Lake said there is preliminary evidence that shows marijuana can help people with addictions reduce their use of hard drugs and ease the painful symptoms of withdrawal.“I’m not saying it’s the answer to the opioid crisis. I’m saying it’s one of the options we should explore,” said Lake, who chose not to run in last spring’s provincial election.“It’s very promising and deserving of further research and there’s no better place to do that than in British Columbia.”Lake, who was hired last August by Quebec-based Hydropothecary, will join a researcher, an activist and others for a discussion of pot as an opioid substitute at the Lift Cannabis Expo in Vancouver on Sunday.There have been “intriguing” early studies that have suggested cannabis might play a beneficial role in lowering the risk of overdose deaths, said M-J Milloy, a research scientist with the BC Centre on Substance Use.A 2014 study in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine found that states with legal cannabis had an opioid death rate that was 25 per cent lower than states where pot was illegal.A Canadian paper, published last year in The International Journal of Drug Policy, surveyed 271 medical cannabis patients and found 63 per cent used pot as a substitute for prescription drugs and 30 per cent used it as a substitute for opiates.Milloy conducted a study that showed marijuana may help wean people off crack cocaine. His team tracked 122 Vancouver-area crack users over a three-year period and found they reported using the harder drug less often when they opted to consume pot.He said there’s a need for more formal, controlled trials on the effect of cannabis on opioid use, and he and fellow scientists at the B.C. centre plan to undertake some of that work.“We certainly have reports from people who are suffering from opioid use disorder that cannabis helps them mitigate the feelings of withdrawal,” said Milloy, who will participate in the talk with Lake on Sunday.“We also know that many people suffering from things like trauma and chronic pain, which are often the roots of opioid addiction, that they also report that cannabis is useful for them.”Some addictions specialists are skeptical of the idea, Lake noted, as they’re concerned about simply substituting one drug for another. More study is needed, and Lake said he hopes Canada will become a hub for marijuana research after it legalizes pot.While Lake may have a financial interest in promoting medical cannabis, he said he thinks companies must be cautious about “overhyping” the benefits of the drug.“It’s not a panacea. It’s not a cure-all. It very much is dependent on the individual, the condition they are dealing with and their individual response,” he said.British Columbia’s public-health emergency, declared in April 2016, is still underway. Between January and November last year, 1,208 people died of illicit drug overdoses in the province, exceeding 2016’s total of 985 fatalities.Lake said he’s come to believe Canada should adopt the approach of Portugal, which decriminalized all drugs and aims to help people dealing with addiction from the perspective of a health concern rather than a criminal problem.Sarah Blyth, an activist who will join Lake and Milloy for the panel discussion, co-founded the High Hopes Foundation, which provides dried cannabis and oil to opioid users in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside.Blyth said a lot of people who have received marijuana through the foundation have stopped using opioids or cut back, though she said she didn’t have concrete numbers.“It helps them go to sleep. It helps them ease physical pain. It helps them ease some of the tension they’re dealing with,” she said. “They know it’s properly dosed. They know what they’re taking.”For several years, the Eden Medicinal Society dispensary chain has also offered cannabis to opioid users to help ease the pain of withdrawal. The chain recently partnered with University of British Columbia psychologist Zach Walsh to deliver a more formal study, which is ongoing.Eden gathered its own data prior to joining forces with Walsh, and found there was a 50 per cent reduction in opiate use among people accessing the program, said Tyler James, the chain’s director of communications.“It was really just to stave off some of the withdrawal symptoms, which can be very debilitating,” he said.— Follow @ellekane on Twitter.last_img read more