Black women’s work and reparations

first_imgThe staff of We Dream in Black, a program of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, July 25.July 31, 2017, was Black Women’s Equal Pay Day — the day this year that the average total wages a Black woman was paid since Jan. 1, 2016, finally equalled the average wage white men were paid in 2016.Seven extra months! That’s 19 months a Black woman had to work, on average, to earn the same wages a white man did in 12 months.Those months are not an abstract quantity. Those are the arduous days and nights of someone like Priscilla Smith, who is a home care worker in North Carolina. Starting in mid-afternoon, on duty until midnight, Smith does difficult work, both physically and socially, assisting up to 20 people a day. She is paid $12 an hour, with no paid sick leave or vacation, and then comes home to care for her own four children.Smith, a leader with We Dream in Black, a program of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, says: “The majority of people who do this kind of work are African-American or Latino women. The world needs to wake up and understand that Black workers need to be acknowledged, respected, and honored for their work.” (rewire.news, July 31) An even more severe wage gap exists for Indigenous women and for documented Latinas, who earn 54 cents for every dollar a white man makes.There are 24 million Black women in the U.S., and 60 percent of them are part of the workforce. But they have high unemployment, imperiled job security, a lack of benefits and advancement opportunities, and are the fastest growing U.S. prison population. Black women work more hours than white women on average, and half of Black women workers are mothers. (Economic Policy Institute, July 28)Famed and wealthy tennis star Serena Williams, speaking on pay discrimination against Black women workers, said: “If I [had] never picked up a tennis racket, I would be one of them. That is never lost on me. The cycles of poverty, discrimination, and sexism are much, much harder to break than the record for Grand Slam titles.” (fortune.com, July 31)Those cycles are rooted in the exploitation of Black women during their enslavement in the U.S. They were not paid for excruciating, forced labor in field or house. Under severest duress, they gave birth to children who were sold into similar bondage. Both kinds of labor by Black women yielded heartbreak, physical torment and death for them — and untold fortunes for Southern planters and the allied Northern banks, insurance companies and businesses.Black women’s unpaid labor — along with that of African-American people in general — was the foundation of modern U.S. capitalism.But Black women have been fighting back against exploitation from their first days on this continent. In addition to rebellious resistance and self-liberation during enslavement, Black women started to do labor organizing in the South as soon as they were emancipated.In 1866, Black women laundry workers presented demands to the mayor of Jackson, Miss., for a higher standard wage so that anyone belonging to the “class of washerwomen” could “live comfortably if possible from the fruits of our labor.”In 1881 in Atlanta, 20 women and a few men formed the Washing Society to demand similar wage increases for their work. They quickly grew to 3,000 primarily African-American women, with a few white women workers also involved. On July 19, they called a militant strike, ultimately successful, and described by historian Tera W. Hunter as “the largest and most impressive among Black Atlantans of late 19th century.” (“To ‘Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War”)The reward for centuries of fighting spirit and organizing by Black women should be more than equal pay. That would only bring their wages equal in the present year.But for those centuries of exploitation and the profits made thereby, there should be reparations! Reparations for enslavement and forced labor, for the terrible damage inflicted by racism.More than just equal pay — we demand reparations for Black women’s unpaid work!FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

P&H HC Imposes Cost Of Rs. 1,00,000/- On Plea Filed Without Territorial Jurisdiction Only To ‘Gain Benefit’ Of Its Interim Order [Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesP&H HC Imposes Cost Of Rs. 1,00,000/- On Plea Filed Without Territorial Jurisdiction Only To ‘Gain Benefit’ Of Its Interim Order [Read Order] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK11 Aug 2020 1:53 AMShare This – xThe Punjab and Haryana High Court recently imposed exemplary costs on the Directors of a Mumbai-based company, who had appeared before it against disqualification order passed against them, only to reap benefits of a precedent set by the High Court, without there being territorial jurisdiction. The single-Judge bench of Justice Alka Sarin noted that neither the Petitioners…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Punjab and Haryana High Court recently imposed exemplary costs on the Directors of a Mumbai-based company, who had appeared before it against disqualification order passed against them, only to reap benefits of a precedent set by the High Court, without there being territorial jurisdiction. The single-Judge bench of Justice Alka Sarin noted that neither the Petitioners were residents of Punjab, Haryana or UT Chandigarh nor the company qua which they were disqualified to act as Directors was registered therein. It further noted that no cause of action, fully or in part, had arisen within its territorial jurisdiction and the Petitioners had invoked its jurisdiction “only to gain benefit” of an interim order passed by it, which was favorable to them in the facts and circumstances. Holding that the writ petition was “clearly unsustainable” and that the Petitioners attempt at forum shopping was “an abuse of jurisdiction”, the Court proceeded to dismiss the petition with costs of Rs.1,00,000/- to be deposited by the petitioners with the PM-CARES Fund. Background The Petitioners were disqualified by the competent authorities from acting as Directors in a Mumbai-based company. While the entire matter occurred within the limits of Mumbai city, the Petitioners had approached the Punjab and Haryana High Court stating that the Respondents’ actions were opposed to the observations made by the High Court in Gurdeep Singh & Ors. Vs. Union of India & Anr. In the said case, vide an interim order dated November 8, 2017, the High Court had directed to activate/ restore the DIN of directors of a company. It noted that law provides penalties for failure to file financial statements or annual returns with the Company Registrar within stipulated time. However, there is no provision for de-activation of the DIN. The Respondents in the present case had informed the Court that the matter was beyond its jurisdiction and the Registrar of Companies, Punjab and Chandigarh had been impleaded as a party by the Petitioners, only to surreptitiously create jurisdiction in Punjab. Findings The Court observed that the petitioners had been unable to show as to “what part of the cause of action arose within the territorial jurisdiction of this Court. There is also no averment in the present writ petition as to how any part of the cause of action had arisen within the territorial jurisdiction of this Court.” It reiterated, “Article 226 of the Constitution of India, in clear terms, empowers the High Court to entertain a writ petition if the cause of action to file such a writ petition against the respondents of the said writ petition has arisen wholly or in part within the territorial jurisdiction of the High Court.” Finding in the facts and circumstances that “there is no ground whatsoever made out” for invoking its jurisdiction, the bench said, “The present writ petition seems to have been filed only to gain benefit of the interim order (Annexure P-7) passed by this Court in CWP. No.24977 of 2017 ‘Gurdeep Singh & Ors. Vs. Union of India & Anr.’ and other similar cases though the initiation of the writ proceedings before this High Court was clearly unsustainable and an abuse of jurisdiction. The filing of the present writ petition before this High Court was not bonafide. In view of the above, the present writ petition deserves to be dismissed with exemplary costs. Dismissed with costs of Rs.1,00,000/- to be deposited by the petitioners with the PM-CARES Fund.” Reliance was placed on ONGC v. Utpal Kumar Basu, (1994) 4 SCC 711, where the Supreme Court cautioned that exceeding of its jurisdiction by any Court, lowers the dignity of the institution. “It must be remembered that the image and prestige of a court depends on how the members of that institution conduct themselves. If an impression gains ground that even in cases which fall outside the territorial jurisdiction of the court, certain members of the court would be willing to exercise jurisdiction on the plea that some event, however trivial and unconnected with the cause of action had occurred within the jurisdiction of the said court, litigants would seek to abuse the process by carrying the cause before such members giving rise to avoidable suspicion. That would lower the dignity of the institution and put the entire system to ridicule,” it had held. Case Details: Case Title: Vijay Goverdhandas Kalantri & Anr. v. Union of India & Ors. Case No.: CWP No. 11209/2020 (O&M) Quorum: Justice Alka Sarin Appearance: Advocate Mukul Goyal (for Petitioner); Standing Counsel Bhuwan Vats (for Union of India) Click Here To Download Order Read Order Next Storylast_img read more

Republic of Korea Navy receives second LST-II landing ship

first_img August 1, 2017 The Republic of Korea Navy received its new landing ship on August 1, according to an announcement from the country’s arms procurement agency DAPA.The Hyundai Heavy Industries-built ship is named ‘Cheon Ja Bong’ and is the second of overall four LST ships to be delivered to the Republic of Korea Navy.Cheon Wang Bong, the lead ship in the class, was delivered in 2014. The new class of ships, also referred to as LST-II ships, will complement the country’s existing Go Jun Bong-class (LST-I) ships.According to DAPA, the new LST-II ships displace 4,500 tons and travel at speeds of up to 23 knots. They are capable of carrying 300 landing troops, three landing craft, two tanks and eight amphibious assault vehicles. The agency added that the ship is capable of operating two helicopters.Cheon Ja Bong started construction in 2013 and was delivered to the navy after completing sea trials. It will now be boarded by its future crew which will prepare to operate the ship once it is commissioned at the end of the year. View post tag: DAPA Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today Republic of Korea Navy receives second LST-II landing ship ‘Cheon Ja Bong’ View post tag: HHIcenter_img View post tag: ROK Navy View post tag: ROKS Cheon Ja Bong Republic of Korea Navy receives second LST-II landing ship ‘Cheon Ja Bong’ Share this articlelast_img read more

Doctors: Children Developing Rare Syndrome after COVID-19 Infection

first_imgCOVID-19 was thought to have little effect on children. But according to doctors in New York City, 15 children have been hospitalized for a rare but serious disorder after contracting the coronavirus. The New York City Department of Health issuing a warning for doctors to be on the lookout for this serious syndrome, first reported lat month in Europe.Doctors say the children first showed symptoms including fever, rash and stomach illness, similar to a rare condition called Kawasaki Disease, which causes the inflammation of blood vessels and can lead to heart problems.As a result, The World Health Organization is investigating whether the coronavirus causes some children to develop a rare inflammatory disease, WHO officials said Wednesday.Health officials in the U.K. warned doctors over the weekend that Covid-19 could be causing a rare inflammatory condition in children. Britain’s Pediatric Intensive Care Society said Monday the National Health Service alerted it to a small number of critically ill children presenting with “an unusual clinical picture.” The society noted that many of the children with symptoms of the new inflammatory disease had been diagnosed with Covid-19. The condition was likened to toxic shock syndrome and Kawasaki disease.“We are aware of this report which came out of the United Kingdom about a small number of cases amongst children with this inflammatory response,” WHO’s lead scientist on Covid-19, Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove, said Wednesday. “We’re looking at this with our clinical network.”It remains unclear what the relationship is between Covid-19 and the inflammatory conditions, but Chris Whitty, England’s chief medical officer, told reporters Monday it is “entirely plausible” that Covid-19 causes the illness.“There are some recent rare descriptions of children in some European countries that have had this inflammatory syndrome, which is similar to the Kawasaki syndrome,” Van Kerkhove said. “But it seems to be very rare.”last_img read more