England Squad update

first_imgFurther to medical assessments of the senior England EPS on Sunday evening and Monday morning, the following players have been called up as injury cover:Tom Wood (Northampton Saints) for Hendrie Fourie (Leeds Carnegie)Dan Ward-Smith (London Wasps) for Simon Shaw (London Wasps)Joe Marler (Harlequins) for David Wilson (Bath Rugby) Hendrie Fourie (bruised rib), Simon Shaw (calf), David Wilson (sore back) and Riki Flutey (calf strain) will all continue to be treated and assessed by the England medical team in consultation with the medics from their clubs. Further details will be announced at the appropriate time.All members of the England senior EPS have arrived in camp to prepare for the first Investec International against New Zealand at Twickenham Stadium on Saturday, November 6. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Brad Barritt (Saracens) for Riki Flutey (London Wasps)last_img read more

QBE launches 2012 RFU President’s XV Awards

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LONDON, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 1: Maggie Alphonsi, RFU President Willie Wildash and Joe Worsley pose with 2011 winners during a photocall to launch the QBE Presidents XV awards at Twickenham Stadium on November 1, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by Getty Images for QBE) Willie Wildash, RFU President said: “It’s a real honour to launch this year’s awards which reward the hard work and innovation which helps grows and sustain our game. From what I have seen over the last five years there have been some great ideas and projects and let’s hope this year follows that trend.”This is the third year that QBE has supported the awards as part of its commitment to the development of the game. Maggie Alphonsi, RFU President Willie Wildash and Joe Worsley help launch the QBE Presidents XV awardsRFU President Willie Wildash, 2003 Rugby World Cup winner Joe Worsley and England star Maggie Alphonsi today joined rugby clubs from across the country at Twickenham Stadium to launch the 2012 RFU President’s XV Awards supported by QBE, the business insurance specialist.Now in their sixth year, the RFU President’s XV Awards identify and reward initiatives that promote the development of rugby at a grassroots level.  The winning club in each of the 15 categories receives £500, with two highly commended projects in each category receiving £100 for their club.The categories cover a range of areas from recruiting volunteers, referees and coaches to developing facilities and driving participation in communities but all entrants must demonstrate outstanding contribution to the development of grassroots rugby through innovative methods and creative thinking.The judging panel consists of RFU President Willie Wildash and also includes Rugby Football Union for Women President Gill Burns, England’s most-capped player Jason Leonard and Sally Rockenbach from QBE, Official Insurance Partner of England Rugby. Elliot Miller, General Manager UK National, QBE European Operations, commented: “QBE is once again proud to support the RFU President’s XV Awards as part of our ongoing commitment to the development of rugby. It is important to recognise and reward efforts of clubs who work hard to improve grassroots rugby. I look forward to hearing how this year’s entrants have come up with innovative ways to develop the sport.”For further details on the President’s XV Awards visit www.rfu.com/presidentsxv or www.qberugby.com.  The closing date for this season’s awards is 1st February 2012.last_img read more

RWC2015: Canada in driving seat heading into decider with USA

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS What it’s for: Canada and USA are flogging each other for the chance to go straight into Pool D of the World CupBy Alan DymockINSURMOUNTABLE IT ain’t, but the USA Eagles have a tough task ahead, overcoming the odds and qualifying outright for Rugby World Cup 2015 after losing 27-9 to Canada in the first leg of their playoff.Both teams now head to Toronto for the deciding match and Canada are heavy favourites to maintain or add to their 18-point advantage and qualify as the America 1 entrant into RWC Pool D with France, Ireland and Italy. In order to still make it to the RWC in England, the loser will have to win in another two-match playoff with Uruguay in order to qualify as the Americas 2 entrant to Pool B with South Africa, Samoa, Scotland and the winner of the Asia 1 qualifier, which is expected to be Japan. It will take more than just good ball retention for USA to win by 19 points or more and a modest Canada must be hopeful that they can execute at Toronto’s BMO Stadium. It all comes down to Saturday.The Eagles’ may be celebrating a sell-out for the first fixture in Charleston, NC and the continued improvements in “the country’s fastest growing team sport,” but it all counts for little if they do not topple Canada, winning for the first time since July 4, 2009. Last Saturday strong performances from winger DTH Van Der Merwe, James Pritchard and Harry Jones did enough to ensure victory for Canada, while USA could only reply with kicks from Saracens full-back Chris Wyles. Talking to the Saracens.com after the game Wyles said: “Canada were more clinical in the important areas and fed off of our mistakes. They do that often, so fair play to Canada – we’ve got to work on our execution and our basics, things like our kicking, our passing, retaining ball and performing as a team.”On the other side, Canada captain Aaron Carpenter said: “The game didn’t go exactly to plan for either side, but we came out on top with physicality and that’s what the game comes down to in the end.” Japan’s captain Toshiaki Hirose (L) scores a try while being tackled by Chris Wyles of US (R) during their five-nation rugby Pacific Nations Cup match in Tokyo on June 23, 2013. Japan beat the US 38-20. AFP PHOTO / TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA (Photo credit should read TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images) Dependable: Chris Wyles and his boot can be relied uponlast_img read more

Japan 2019 Travel Guide: Sado

first_img Advertising FeatureJapan 2019 Travel Guide: SadoA small island located off the coast of Niigata on Honshu, Sado is the perfect place to discover Japanese traditions…The Culture Vulture Onidaiko (demon drumming) is a form of folk entertainment unique to Sado, with ‘demons’ dancing to the beat of drums. It’s performed at shrine festivals to pray for plentiful harvests and bountiful catches of seafood, as well as to drive out misfortune. Look out for one of the more than 100 active Onidaiko groups across the island – no two groups have the same dance moves.Beat the drum: An Onidaiko display – folk entertainmentAnother tradition alive and well is Noh, a form of Japanese theatre involving music, dance and drama performed since the 14th century. A third of Japan’s remaining Noh stages are on Sado Island.The Foodie Burikatsu-don is a yellowtail cutlet rice bowl using Sado-produced ingredients, from the fish to the rice flour for the coating to the sauce.A handful of Sado farmers grow Violette de Sollies figs, often referred to as the “rare black diamond” as they’re scarce. Be sure to hunt them down! The AdventurerThe taraibune (tub boat) can only be found on the island of Sado. It is still used to collect shellfish and seaweed from the rocky coastal waters not accessible by traditional fishing boats, but it is also possible for tourists to take a leisurely ride in them.Head to Futatsugame at low tide, when a walkway appears to connect the two large rocks off the coast. Another giant rock to seek out is Onogame, a 167-metre tall monolith overlooking the ocean.Hard rock: Onogame is 167m tall and overlooks the oceanThe Party Animal Snack bars may not sound glamorous but these are some of the most happening places to be at on Sado at night. Drink to your heart’s content and enjoy karaoke at these bars. One recommendation is Usagi, located a ten-minute walk from Ryotsu Port.For more travel information… visitsado.com/en TAGS: Japan This fascinating island is full of history, culture, food and nature LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tub-thumping: Taraibune boats can only be found on the island of Sado How to get thereTravel to Sado Island’s Ryotsu Port in one hour by high-speed jetfoil or two-and-a-half hours by car ferry from Niigata. The island is also accessible from Naoetsu Port, with boats docking at Ogi Port on the island.last_img read more

Jean de Villiers on facing the British & Irish Lions

first_img“Playing a home game in South Africa is an unbelievable experience,” he says. “You do take a lot of energy from what is a unique home crowd. That said, I got a shock when I ran out of the tunnel and saw a sea of red in the stands.“There we were, expecting home-ground advantage in one of the biggest games of our lives. The travelling support was so significant, however, that it effectively cancelled out the home support. But we took that as part of the challenge. It motivated us in that we thought, ‘Right, we’re going to show these Lions fans how a Bok team performs at home’.”South Africa went on to win that Test in Durban on the back of a dominant forward performance. Experience, says De Villiers, pulled the hosts through a more challenging second fixture in Pretoria.“Jaque Fourie replaced me in the second half after I left the field with a shoulder injury. He ended up scoring an amazing try in the corner that brought us back into the game.“It’s funny how things work out. I don’t know whether I would have been quick enough to score that try.“We were tested a great deal over those first two games, but we had a core of veterans who had played at the 2007 World Cup and who understood what it took to perform under intense pressure. That was the difference on the day in Pretoria.”Jean de Villiers’s South Africa travel tips for Lions fansThe Lions will play two fixtures at the Cape Town Stadium next year. After tackling the Stormers in the tour opener on 3 July, Warren Gatland’s charges will return to the ‘Mother City’ on 31 July for the second Test against the Springboks.De Villiers says that visiting fans – and perhaps a few former Lions players – won’t want for distractions ahead of those matches.“The Western Cape has something for everyone, from the mountains and beaches of Cape Town to the wine farms in the Boland. It’s a short drive from the Mother City to Gansbaai – where braver tourists can experience a cage-dive with a great white shark – and only a two-hour journey to game farms that have the ‘Big Five’ (lion, leopard, rhino, elephant and buffalo).FIND OUT ABOUT THE LIONS RUGBY TRAVEL PACKAGES FOR THE 2021 TOUR“I’m an avid golfer and nothing beats a day out on one of the region’s golf courses. Often you’ll play a round with the mountain on one side and the ocean on the other. Pearl Valley at Val de Vie Estate is a favourite of mine, as it’s close to where I stay out in the winelands. The Metropolitan Golf Club is another good option and is right in the shadow of the Cape Town Stadium.“I expect that the series in 2021 may prompt the return of some former Lions tourists. I’d love to catch up with old Munster team-mates like Paul O’Connell (who led the Lions in 2009) and serve as a guide to them in this beautiful country. We’ll be competitive on the golf course – that’s always a given – but there will be time for a pint or two in the aftermath.” Jon Cardinelli talks to the former South Africa captain about the 2009 tour and his travel tips for visiting fans LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Boks v LIons: Jean de Villiers beats Jamie Roberts to the ball during the 2009 series (Getty Images) center_img Jean de Villiers on facing the British & Irish LionsThe second Test between South Africa and the British & Irish Lions in 2009 will be remembered as one of the most dramatic clashes of all time. The Lions had the upper hand for much of the contest until the Springboks fought back to level the scores in the final quarter.When replacement Ronan O’Gara mistimed a challenge for a high ball and clattered into Bok scrum-half Fourie du Preez, the writing was on the wall for the tourists. Fly-half Morne Steyn stepped up to slot a long-range penalty that sealed a series victory for the hosts – not to mention bragging rights for the next 12 years.Jean de Villiers left the field with an injury in the second half and was forced to watch the heart-stopping climax from the South African bench. Several months later, as a new signing at Munster, he used that series-deciding incident to break the ice with O’Gara.Key moment: Ronan O’Gara upends Fourie du Preez late in the 2009 second Test (Getty Images)“Munster used to split their training sessions during the week between the grounds in Cork and Limerick,” the former Bok centre remembers. “You really had to maximise your time and engage with players and coaches when you had the chance.“I decided to stay late and do a bit of extra training with the kickers. ROG eventually put up a high ball and I seized the moment. I raced in and as I collected it, I looked at him and said, ‘Please don’t take me out in the air, ROG’. He immediately cracked a smile and said, ‘You’re a funny guy. You and I are going to get on just fine’.“That’s one of the great things about rugby; you can battle these players on the field and still be mates off it. I was fortunate in that I got to play with some of those great players at Munster a few months after the Lions series. Eleven years later, and I still count them among my good mates.”Most of the players who starred in South Africa’s successful 2007 World Cup campaign were prominent in the series against the Lions two years later. On the back of that success, the Boks won the 2009 Tri-Nations and climbed to the top of the World Rugby rankings.Roll back the calendar 12 months, however, and South African rugby was at a crossroads. The Boks blew hot and cold in the 2008 Tri-Nations, and were under pressure to bounce back when they travelled north to face Wales, Scotland and England.“In that era, very few players who represented overseas clubs were selected for the national side,” says De Villiers, who captained the Boks between 2012 and 2015 and amassed 109 Test caps. “So after the 2007 World Cup, most of us made the decision to stay in South Africa with a view to qualifying for that series against the Lions. Winning that series was our next big goal, and we started to prepare for the challenge in the 2008 season.”Big win: Bryan Habana leads South Africa’s celebrations at Twickenham in 2008 (Getty Images)Of the 42-6 win over England in the preceding year, De Villiers says: “I have a lot of good memories of that win at Twickenham. Everything just seemed to click. It was massively encouraging to know that we could go north and beat one of the top sides by such a convincing margin.“Coming home with three wins gave us an edge ahead of the subsequent Lions series. We knew that a lot of those players from Wales, Scotland and England would be part of the squad travelling to South Africa in 2009.”Six months later, De Villiers and his team-mates were surprised by the reception they received ahead of the first Test at Kings Park. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

El ministerio universitario cambia para servir a nuevos estudiantes

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL El ministerio universitario cambia para servir a nuevos estudiantes Que la Iglesia ‘sea empresarial’ con las subvenciones An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Un presupuesto basado en la misiónEl presupuesto 2013-2015 aprobado por la Convención General asignó $300.000 a subvenciones del ministerio universitario (el Renglón 67 puede verse aquí). Esas subvenciones forman parte de los medios en que la DFMS responde a la segunda Marca de la Misión que llama a todos los miembros de la Comunión Anglicana a enseñar, bautizar y formar a nuevos creyentes. Las subvenciones tienen por objeto, específicamente, establecer o revitalizar ministerios universitarios y concebir nuevas formas de llegar a jóvenes adultos que tradicionalmente es menos probable que se acerquen a un ministerio universitario.En su reciente Informe a la Iglesia, la DFMS hacía notar que había asignado $204.348 hasta el presente.La Convención General también pidió específicamente la creación de dos nuevos ministerios universitarios a establecerse en colegios universitarios, comunitarios o tribales, u otras instituciones de estudios superiores de dos años, en cada una de las nueve provincias de la Iglesia Episcopal. La Resolución C069 también pedía el adiestramiento de líderes locales del ministerio universitario.La resolución, auspiciada por la VI Provincia, hacía notar “la creciente importancia de las universidades comunitarias como lugares fundamentales para la evangelización y la formación cristiana, particularmente entre poblaciones racial, étnica y socioeconómicamente diversas”.Angell le dijo a ENS que “la oportunidad es realmente grande porque ‘la universidad comunitaria’ es casi una contradicción de términos o un nombre poco apropiado debido a que en muchas universidades comunitarias no existe ninguna clase de comunidad”.“Luego, ¿en qué consiste levantar una comunidad en una situación donde no compites con cien mil otros clubes y fraternidades, masculinas y femeninas?” pregunta él. “Consigues captar a los estudiantes para quienes la presencia significa muchísimo y la oportunidad de tener una comunidad en medio de una situación docente no tradicional es realmente grande”.Angell también apuntó que las universidades comunitarias se están convirtiendo en el punto de entrada a la educación superior para estudiantes de comunidades inmigrantes. Esos estudiantes son con frecuencia los primeros de sus familias en ir a la universidad y necesitan un apoyo firme”, agregó.“No sólo apoyamos a los estudiantes episcopales no tradicionales, estamos tratando de apoyar a los estudiantes universitarios no tradicionales”, afirmó Angell.La Convención estructuró el actual presupuesto trienal en torno a las Cinco Marcas de la Misión de la Comunión [Anglicana] y proporcionó sumas significativas no asignadas para nuevas obras orientadas en torno a cada una de las Marcas de la Misión. La intención era que la labor resultante se hiciera en nuevas asociaciones de colaboración con diócesis y congregaciones. La DFMS ha proporcionado el capital inicial o las subvenciones compartidas o ambas cosas, así como el apoyo y la experiencia del personal para la nueva tarea.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Releasecenter_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID El costado de la cocina móvil de Una Fiesta Movible puede ser un espacio para escribir, permitiéndole a los estudiantes de cada campus que el ministerio visita en Carolina del Norte hacer suyo el camión de remolque. Foto de Una Fiesta Movible [A Moveable Feast] vía Facebook.[Episcopal News Service] La manera en que los estudiantes adquieren sus diplomas universitarios en Estados Unidos está cambiando y el ministerio universitario de la Iglesia Episcopal está respondiendo de manera creativa a ese cambio.Los ejemplos de esa innovación, apoyada por subvenciones de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS), incluyen un ministerio interreligioso en una universidad no residencial del estado, una combinación de un camión cocina y capilla que visitará instalaciones universitarias en Carolina del Norte y un empeño en Dakota del Norte en ofrecer ayuda holística a estudiantes nativoamericanos. (La DFMS [Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society] es el nombre legal y canónico con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión).“Las prioridades de la Iglesia Episcopal en el ministerio universitario se cumplen allí donde más estudiantes se matriculan actualmente”, dijo el Rdo. Mike Angell, misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal para el ministerio de jóvenes adultos y el universitario.“La educación superior para muchísimos estudiantes no se parece a una licenciatura de cuatro años, en consecuencia estamos tratando de lograr que la Iglesia sea creativa en la manera de llevar a cabo el ministerio universitario, que sea empresarial. Estas subvenciones ofrecen el capital inicial para iniciar nuevos proyectos, nuevos modos de ministrar a jóvenes adultos en la educación superior: algunos de los cuales no son estudiantes de jornada completa, algunos de los cuales están explorando cómo será su carrera docente”.El ministerio universitario en Dakota del NortePor ejemplo, la Diócesis de Dakota del Norte está usando una subvención para liderazgo de $25.000 otorgada por la DFMS para establecer lo que el Rdo. Canónigo John Floberg llama un ministerio holístico para los estudiantes nativoamericanos que asisten al Colegio Universitario Toro Sentado [Sitting Bull College] en Fort Yates en la reserva india de Standing Rock y en la Universidad Tecnológica de las Tribus Unidas en Bismarck.Floberg es miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal.Si bien la espiritualidad es fundamental para el ministerio universitario “no va a ser lo único que ayude a los estudiantes a cursar la universidad”, dijo Floberg, refiriéndose especialmente a los estudiantes nativos que a veces necesitan más que el estímulo habitual y la ayuda práctica para permanecer en la escuela. Esa ayuda puede ser tan básica como el dinero que necesita un estudiante para volver a la escuela luego de haber tenido que viajar a su casa para una emergencia de familia, explicó él.El Colegio Universitario de Toro Sentado, en Fort Yates, Dakota del Norte, en la reserva india de Standing Rock, es uno de los lugares donde la DFMS apoya a la personas que tienen un enfoque creativo del ministerio universitario. Foto de Sitting Bull College.El ministerio que se ha concebido no es una calle de una sola vía. Los Witayas (“grupos reunidos” en lengua sioux) que Floberg espera crear usarán un modelo de apoyo mutuo basado en las técnicas para la prevención de suicidios “Fuentes de Energía” que se desarrollaron en Dakota del Norte. El modelo se utilizaría para “el apoyo mutuo de los estudiantes que asisten a la universidad, se diploman y lo hacen con la esperanza y la perseverancia que forman parte de la fe cristiana”, escribió Floberg en el número de noviembre del boletín diocesano.Floberg, que como misionero canónico es responsable de cinco congregaciones extendidas en un área de más de 480 kilómetros en Dakota del Norte, tanto dentro como fuera de las reservas, dijo que la Iglesia con frecuencia tiene relaciones con estudiantes nativos formados en estos grupos de jóvenes. Hacerles seguimiento a estos estudiantes en su transición a la universidad es un “próximo paso lógico”, pero ese paso no siempre se da. Tanto Toro Sentado como Tribus Unidas “están llenas de personas que ya conoces y que se encuentran en un momento de transición en la vida al que la Iglesia no le ha prestado mucho atención”, afirmó.Un objetivo adicional del programa de compañerismo es apoyar los empeños educativos y tribales para ayudar a los estudiantes a discernir cómo podrían contribuir con sus comunidades usando sus diplomas en beneficio de la tribu, dijo Floberg, quien resaltó que él le estaba hablando a Episcopal News Service en el 124º. aniversario (15 de diciembre de 1890) de la muerte de Toro Sentado, el jefe y líder espiritual sioux que dijo: “unamos nuestras mentes y veamos lo que la vida puede hacer por nuestros hijos”. Floberg añadió que los mentores también podrían discutir el ministerio futuro de los estudiantes, laicos u ordenados.Esos son los objetivos a largo plazo. En el ínterin, Floberg brinda lo que podría llamarse el fundamento práctico de gran parte del ministerio: comida gratis. En Toro Sentado, él ofrece almuerzos en el atrio del edificio de ciencias y el programa ha comprado una parrilla y un horno de ahumar carne (móviles) para hacer parrilladas. Las comidas son un medio de dar a conocer la presencia de la Iglesia y de compartir información acerca de los planes para el ministerio.Sobre la marcha en Carolina del NorteLa comida fue la génesis de Una Fiesta Movible, un ministerio universitario de la Diócesis de Carolina del Norte basado en un camión de remolque al que se le ha adaptado una cocina y un espacio para la oración.La idea fue de Anne Hodges-Copple, obispa sufragánea de Carolina del Norte, durante el recorrido que hizo por la diócesis previo a su elección. “Me mantuve hablando de la necesidad de nosotros, como diócesis, de no recurrir a trucos, sino de intentar ser más creativos y emprendedores en nuestros empeños de dar a las antiguas tradiciones una renovada expresión en lugares inesperados y no obstante inspiradores”, dio ella a ENS.Hodges-Copple, que fuera anteriormente la capellana episcopal en la Universidad de Duke, dijo que comenzó a combinar su deseo de ministrar en “instalaciones universitarias históricamente abandonadas o desatendidas —especialmente en universidades comunitarias”— con la ubicuidad de los camiones de comida en Durham, Carolina del Norte. Cuando ella le propuso la idea al Rdo. Nils Chittenden, que en ese tiempo era el ministro de los jóvenes en la diócesis y capellán episcopal en Duke, él inmediatamente dijo “¡claro que sí!”.Caitlyn Darnell, coordinadora de Fiesta Movible lo explicó de este modo: “me quedé absolutamente fascinada por la idea”.El Rdo. Nils Chittenden, que en ese tiempo era el ministro diocesano para la juventud y el capellán episcopal en la Universidad de Duke, y Caitlyn Darnell, coordinadora de Una Fiesta Movible, le sirven cidra caliente a Anne Hodges-Copple, obispa sufragánea de Carolina del Norte, durante la convención diocesana de noviembre pasado en la cual el ministerio universitario móvil hizo su debut. Foto de la Diócesis de Carolina del Norte vía Facebook.Le llevó bastante tiempo a Chittenden, Darnell y Hodges-Copple resolver cómo poner la idea en práctica, y fueron muy prudentes en lo que respecta al rostro y la imagen del ministerio.“Ha habido muchísimas empresas y nuevas iniciativas de la Iglesia que han intentado hacer cosas realmente atractivas por hacer algo realmente atractivo, y algún postadolescente o alguien que está empezando la veintena lo mira y lo toma como ‘algo bastante tonto’, dijo Darnell.Darnell trabaja a media jornada para la diócesis en su papel en Una Fiesta Movible y está en su segundo año de ubicación a través del Cuerpo de Servicio Episcopal —una entidad asociada a la DFMS— con El Proyecto Abraham. Ella trabaja en la iglesia episcopal de San Timoteo [St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church] en Winston-Salem como asistente de formación. A la Rda. Stephanie Yancy la nombraron misionera diocesana interina para el ministerio de jóvenes adultos a mediados de enero, y sucederá a Chittenden que se convirtió en rectora de la iglesia episcopal de San Esteban [St Stephen’s Episcopal Church] en Armonk, Nueva York, a fines de enero. Yancy se encargará de dirigir Una Fiesta Movible.Aunque la idea de lo que se convirtió en Una Fiesta Movible comenzó como un camión de comida, Darnell dijo que el grupo también estaba contemplando utilizar un autobús o un vehículo recreativo. Darnell no recuerda bien cuándo y cómo se le ocurrió la idea del remolque, pero ahora Una Fiesta Movible se traslada en un camión de 28 pies especialmente equipado. Hay un pequeño espacio en el frente para una oración individual o para una conversación con el capellán, y hay una cocina en el fondo. Recordando sus años el colegio universitario de William and Mary, Darnell dijo, “tener la capilla es una parte realmente, realmente importante de lo que hacemos” porque la vida de la universidad puede ser caótica e incluso los estudiantes extrovertidos pueden sentirse a veces “excesivamente estimulados o inundados de cosas” y necesitados de un espacio de silencio.La comida puede servirse desde una ventana en el costado del remolque o en la parte trasera, que se baja y se convierte en una plataforma que puede cubrirse con una tienda, explicó Darnell, y la comida puede servirse desde el altar “de manera que obtienes también esa teología realmente atractiva de la cena eucarística”.Puesto que el ministerio conlleva moverse entre las instalaciones universitarias, hasta el color del camión era un asunto delicado: el remolque no podía destacar los colores del equipo de una escuela por encima de otra. Durante la reunión de junio en la iglesia episcopal de San Felipe [St. Philip’s Episcopal Church] en Durham, a las personas que asistieron de la iglesia y del campus de la localidad se les pidió que aportasen sus ideas acerca del ministerio, así surgió la idea de que el remolque fuese “un pizarrón comunitario”. El camión es negro y a la gente de cada campus se le invita que escriba en los costados, apropiándose de ese espacio en cada visita.Una Fiesta Movible espera asociarse con las iglesias u otras agrupaciones locales que deseen ayudar en la preparación y servicio de las comidas, y que estén dispuestas a aprender a ministrar a jóvenes adultos, dijo Darnell. Deberán ser receptivos a saber qué esperar de este tipo de ministerio y cómo cambiará la experiencia de su parroquia, añadió.Las ruedas están girando, dijo Darnell, para establecer una presencia en la Universidad Comunitaria de Johnson, en Smithfield, en la Universidad Central de Carolina del Norte, en Durham y en el Colegio Universitario Johnson C. Smith en Charlotte. Si bien Barton College en Wilson también está en su lista, esas conversaciones no han comenzado todavía, explicó ella. Una Fiesta Movible espera estar en la Universidad Comunitaria Tecnológica de Durham también este año, agregó.Una Fiesta Movible también ha ayudado a formar una comunidad de tres jóvenes adultos, conocidos como compañeros, que viajarán con el camión para ser mentores y ministros de sus iguales.Todos estos aspectos de Una Fiesta Movible están relacionados, dijo Hodges-Copple, con el relato del Jesús resucitado en el camino de Emaús la noche de la primera Pascua. El ministerio espera “llevar la compañía de Jesucristo junto a muchas personas, proporcionándoles un encuentro transformador con Dios en un contexto sorprendente y de algún modo no tradicional”, según explica la página web [de este ministerio].El ministerio recibió una subvención para el liderazgo de $30.000 por dos años de la DFMS en noviembre de 2013.Entre tanto en el sur de CaliforniaEn el otro extremo del país, la comida no es lo fundamental para el ministerio del Rdo. Sean Lanigan en la Universidad del Estado de California en Long Beach, aunque “intenté crear un estudio bíblico convencional y un ministerio universitario de pizza”, contó él de su llegada allí hace dos años.No pareció funcionar en el campus de 40.000 estudiantes no residentes, en consecuencia se dio a la tarea de captar lo que funcionaria. No tardó en descubrir que “lo que sí parecía funcionar era motivar [a las personas] con lo interreligioso”.Y el activismo. El ministerio se dio a conocer rápidamente como el “Proyecto Interreligioso” y desde entonces ha formado un grupo básico de aproximadamente una docena de estudiantes predominantemente musulmanes y judíos que han abordado asuntos tales como el empoderamiento de las mujeres y la fe y el clima.“Se ha convertido en una emergente y creciente reunión de estudiantes interesados en crear relaciones por encima de las fronteras… [y] en aprender a vivir en un mundo de diferencias”, dijo Lanigan.Algunos miembros del Proyecto Interreligioso del ministerio universitario en la Universidad del Estado de California en Long Beach participaron con el Rdo. Sean Lanigan en la celebración de la reciente temporada navideña.Ese interés marca la diferencia con la mayoría de otras agrupaciones universitarias, dice él. “La Universidad de California en Long Beach es increíblemente diversa e increíblemente estratificada, pero no hay muchos grupos en el campus que trasciendan las fronteras”.El ministerio es un esfuerzo conjunto de la DFMS y la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América, dijo Lanigan, sacerdote episcopal en la Diócesis de Los Ángeles. Lanigan y el ministerio se basan en la iglesia luterana de Nuestro Salvador [Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church] en Long Beach. La Diócesis [episcopal] de Los Ángeles, la ELCA y su Sínodo del Sur de California proporcionan constante ayuda económica, según explicó él. Una junta de episcopales y luteranos, tanto clérigos como laicos, creó esta asociación y sigue desarrollando el ministerio universitario y una nueva comunidad de culto llamada Tierras Santas [Holy Grounds].Una reciente subvención de $5.000 de la DFMS ayudará a financiar la continuación del ministerio, incluido el sostén de la presencia de Dominique Bocanegra, becaria urbana episcopal de media jornada que ayuda como organizadora y promotora de la misión, dijo Lanigan.Hasta que ella comenzó a trabajar con el Proyecto Interreligioso en agosto, Bocanegra, de 23 años, no se había “dado cuenta de cuan interconectada está realmente la fe y cómo se relaciona con lo que ocurre en Estados Unidos y a través del mundo”.El Proyecto Interreligioso aborda el meollo de muchos problemas, añadió ella: “Hay mucha tensión —para mí, debido a la falta de diálogo, a la falta de relaciones”.Ella espera ayudar a concentrar los esfuerzos de los estudiantes en problemas de justicia porque “no todas las personas sin hogar son cristianas; no todo el que sufre de sequía es musulmán. No tenemos que sentarnos aquí y decir ‘usted debe convertirse a mi religión’, sino, a través de mi experiencia y de mis ojos usted puede oír cómo vemos la sequía: es así como vemos a nuestros hermanos y hermanas en la calle”.Aliyah Shaikh, de 19 años, alumna de estudios internacionales especializados en el Oriente Medio y el Norte de África, dijo que el Proyecto Interreligioso le da un espacio para hacer amistades con personas de distintos orígenes.“El Proyecto Interreligioso parece ser la única agrupación estudiantil que reúne ese tipo de capacidad”, dijo Shaikh, miembro de la junta de la Asociación Estudiantil Musulmana.Ella calcula que alrededor de un 70 a un 80 por ciento del núcleo del grupo está compuesto de mujeres musulmanas. El restante 20 o 30 por ciento suelen ser estudiantes de Bell Hillel, la organización estudiantil judía, y un asistente regular es budista.“Tenemos el desafío de conseguir más asistentes cristianos, y estamos tratando de pensar en modos de acercarnos mutuamente”, dijo ella.Lanigan estuvo de acuerdo. “Estamos intentando crear en el campus tantas colaboraciones como sean posibles”, afirmó. “Estamos tratando de interesarnos en lo que pasa, en el campus y en [un ámbito] mucho más amplio, y cómo la religión puede ser parte de todo eso. No nos sentamos a filosofar acerca de Dios, aunque eso puede ocurrir a veces. Principalmente, hablamos de la manera en que, como seres humanos, compartimos juntos esta labor”. Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Por Mary Frances Schjonberg y Pat McCaughanPosted Mar 7, 2015 last_img read more

St. Paul’s Chapel celebrates 250 years in Lower Manhattan

first_imgSt. Paul’s Chapel celebrates 250 years in Lower Manhattan By Lynette Wilson Posted Oct 31, 2016 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Trinity Wall Street’s rector, the Rev. William Lupfer, preaches during a prayer service celebrating the 250th anniversary of St. Paul’s Chapel. Photo credit: Leah Reddy/Trinity Church Wall Street[Episcopal News Service] Two hundred and fifty years to the day it opened its doors in Lower Manhattan in what was then the countryside, St. Paul’s Chapel celebrated its anniversary with a special worship service and setting off a yearlong celebration.In his sermon, the Rev. William Lupfer, rector of Trinity Wall Street, imagined what the third rector of Trinity Wall Street, the Rev. Samuel Auchmuty, was thinking when he preached the first-ever sermon based on the Burning Bush and seeing God at the opening of St. Paul’s Chapel in 1766.“I’m sure he was imagining in his heart all the work that would be required to see God and that this chapel would become a workshop for ministry, a place to hold the prayers and aspirations of the generations that were to come,” said Lupfer, and since that time. “Imagine the prayers that have been in these walls.“Imagine the prayers that have been in these walls … during war and peace, during flooding during mob violence, during slavery and civil rights. Imagine all the prayers that came here.”From there, 350 people present took a moment to imagine those prayers.For 250 years, St. Paul’s Chapel, part of Trinity Church Wall Street parish in Lower Manhattan, has stood as a symbol of faith, endurance and social good.“St. Paul’s Chapel … has endured and thrived as the symbolic heart of Lower Manhattan, offering a place of solace, worship and community for New York City’s diverse residents,” read Manhattan Borough President Gail Brewer, proclaiming Oct. 30, 2016, “St. Paul’s Appreciation Day.”Brewer and New York City Council member Margaret Chin, both read proclamations honoring St. Paul’s Chapel. Mayor Bill de Blasio, who did not attend, in a proclamation declared Oct. 30, 2016, St. Paul’s Chapel Day in the City of New York. Governor Andrew Cuomo and U.S. Senator Kristen Gillibrand also sent proclamations in honor of St. Paul’s.Trinity Wall Street’s “Chapel of Ease,” as it was called when it opened, catered to the city’s growing population. It is now the oldest surviving church building in Manhattan and the only one to remain in continuous use since Colonial days.Following his inauguration as the first president of the United States, George Washington and his cabinet walked the half-mile from Federal Hall to worship at St. Paul’s Chapel. It withstood the great fire of 1776, which destroyed 500 buildings in a single night, including Trinity Church. And it withstood the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, which destroyed the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers less than a block away and killed 2,606 people. Immediately following the attacks on the World Trade Center, St. Paul’s Chapel became a staging area and respite for first responders at ground zero and continued in that ministry about nine months following the attacks. It later served as a memorial, where mourners, tourists and others continued to come over the last 15 years.The historic chapel at Broadway and Fulton streets, recently underwent renovation to restore it to its 18th-century appearance. The interior was painted with 500 gallons of the historically appropriate colors of natural cream, white dove and deep caviar. The crystal chandeliers crafted by artisans more than 200 years ago were cleaned. The original statue of St. Paul carved from tulip poplar, which overlooked Broadway from a niche on the outside of the chapel for more than two centuries, has been conserved and moved indoors to the southeast corner of the sanctuary. (A weather–resistant resin replica stands outside.)Inside, a new exhibit will explore St. Paul’s 250 years and the diverse ministries of the chapel, particularly those of reconciliation and healing.  As part of that telling, a new 9/11 Chapel of Remembrance has been created and will offer visitors a place of reflection with artifacts on display that recall the volunteer ministry the parish hosted to care for Ground Zero’s rescue and recovery workers.Click here more at about St. Paul’s Chapel and see a full schedule of 250th-anniversary events.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

Liturgy and Music committee offers church a plan to unscramble…

first_img March 6, 2018 at 11:01 am St. Patrick’s Day on March 18? What other typos are contained herein? Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Liturgy and Music committee offers church a plan to unscramble its calendar of saints ‘Situation of great confusion’ was 10 years in the making In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY March 6, 2018 at 12:02 pm The daily prayers and scripture readings for the weekdays of Lent are not in this volume because General Convention 2015 already authorized them, and they were published as a separate volume called “Weekday Eucharistic Propers”. Whether or not one volume or two makes more sense is probably ultimately a decision of Church Publishing, although I’m sure they would be glad to receive feedback from the church. But the reason that these are not being sent to General Convention this year is simply that there are no proposed changes to what the church already authorized and published 3 years ago. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Br. Anselm Philip says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Elizabeth Anderson says: Rector Tampa, FL The Standing Committee on Liturgy and Music has spent the 2016-2018 triennium attempting to bring order to the Episcopal Church’s calendar of commemorations. Photo: Church Publishing Inc.[Episcopal News Service] The church’s calendar of saints has been in a state of extreme flux for years, and the Standing Committee on Liturgy and Music is recommending a way for General Convention to remedy what it calls a “situation of great confusion.”The SCLM’s proposal is contained in its Blue Book report to convention. The subcommittee report on the calendar can be found via the side navigation.The committee said in its report that it inherited a “situation of great confusion about what the calendar of the church was, and what General Convention wanted the next steps to be.” The Blue Book report outlines that multiyear confusion.“The SCLM’s first step was to pause, take a breath, and determine a clear narrative for where our calendar has been, what has happened to it over the past 10 years, and what General Convention asked us to do this triennium,” the Rev. Devon Anderson, SCLM chair, told Episcopal News Service.“In some instances, the SCLM received conflicting directives from General Convention. Our Calendar Subcommittee, chaired by Liza Anderson, charted the calendar’s past course in order to interpret and engage the work we were asked to do this triennium, and propose a clear path forward for next triennium. So, what you will see in the report is clarity. We have graphs!”The 2015 General Convention sent the SCLM 11 resolutions related to the church’s various lists of saints that it has chosen to remember and honor. Those resolutions, along with feedback from the church, led the committee to decide that it ought to prepare a new edition of Lesser Feasts and Fasts, which would better reflect the diversity of the church and could work in conjunction with A Great Cloud of Witnesses, which the last General Convention voted to “make available” but did not authorize.Efforts have been ongoing to create a calendar that reflects the church’s diversity to replace the current list of commemorations that, in the committee’s words, “still skews overwhelmingly clerical, white, and male.” Even the process begun in 2003, which resulted in Holy Women, Holy Men, added 100 commemorations, but they also tended to be white, male clergy.The SCLM is recommending that convention authorize for optional use its revised version of Lesser Feasts and Fasts, which reflects what it calls “judicious pruning” of names made possible by the idea that A Great Cloud of Witnesses can include some of those names. The report said pruning is needed because convention has been “dramatically increasing the rate at which it adds commemorations, with no signs of slowing down.”Yet, it said, Episcopalians are concerned about the sheer number of commemorations and their scope, including having multiple choices of people to honor on some days. “Given the inability of the calendar committee to bend space and time in order to create more days in a calendar year, the only solution we see is to keep the commemorations on the main calendar to a manageable number, and to use A Great Cloud of Witnesses to include an even wider scope of individuals,” the SCLM wrote.The committee also considered the issue of the criteria by which the church decides to include people on the calendar.“General Convention kicked the calendar back to Lesser Feasts and Fasts, which included the criteria for inclusion in Lesser Feasts and Fasts,” Anderson said. “It also passed a resolution directing SCLM to include former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court (and General Convention deputy) Thurgood Marshall on the calendar, with an emphatic ‘Now!’“But under Lesser Feasts and Fasts’ criteria, Marshall could not be included, as at least two generations have not passed since his death in 1993. Our calendar committee struck the difference, placing Marshall, in addition to Pauli Murray and Florence Li Tim-Oi, on the draft calendar in brackets, and submitted a resolution that the brackets be removed and the three become a permanent part of our calendar.”The committee recommended that convention authorize Lesser Feasts and Fasts for “optional use throughout the church,” noting that the idea of “trial use” does not canonically apply to anything other than revisions of the Book of Common Prayer. A process of “optional use” with the next iteration of the SCLM monitoring feedback will allow for refinements at the 2021 meeting of convention, the SCLM said.The members added a caveat, saying that while they recognize the sometimes irresistible “temptation to tinker with the calendar on the floor of convention,” they generally believe that “the church will ultimately have the highest-quality document if significant revisions can wait until the church has had the opportunity to test this new volume, and if all of the anticipated necessary revisions can be accomplished organically rather than by a process of individual resolutions and amendments.”The committee’s proposed revised Lesser Feasts and Fasts can be found here.ENS’ previous coverage of the SCLM’s proposals on prayer book revision is here.The SCLM plans to post on its blog a series of essays about the various projects it worked on during this triennium and will host online discussions there.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Robert Stiefel says: Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT General Convention 2018, Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Liturgy & Music Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK March 5, 2018 at 5:52 pm I am just as disappointed by this proposal for Lesser Feasts and Fasts as I was with A Great Cloud of Witnesses. I still use Holy Women, Holy Men with my Daily Offices for the following reasons. The Church Year begins with Advent in December with the first Saint honored on November 30th Andrew the Apostle, and ends the following November. I don’t like A Great Cloud of Witnesses and I am not going to use this new book if they are again going to start with January through December. As a matter of the Liturgical Year this is so wrong. Also, the news books have omitted the beautiful daily prayers and Scripture readings for the Weekdays of Lent. It was a very poor decision to omit these. As I said, I won’t use this book. I think it is a terrible version. Add all the Saints you want, but, don’t disturb the great elements of the Church Year to do it. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags The Revd Canon Richard C. Wrede says: Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (5) Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA General Convention, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. March 7, 2018 at 6:10 pm I remember my surprise, joy, and pride when S. Gregory the Illuminator (now Enlightener) appeared on the Calendar over 50 years ago. My tribe still appreciates how Episcopal parishes offered us a convenient and familiar house of worship. Now it seems Armenia’s loss is Georgia’s gain, withmore gender parity to boot. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 6, 2018 at 9:35 pm Why was G. F. Handel dropped? He was equally as great a composer for the Church as was Bach. // Also, one of the entries is wrong. Dorothy L. Sayers never allowed her name to appear without the middle initial. Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 5, 2018 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Martin Goshgarian says: Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Schentrups deliver emotional plea to end gun violence

first_img cynthia seddon says: July 9, 2018 at 12:31 am No other developed nation has armed teachers to prevent mass shootings in classrooms, nor armed guards. I don’t think we need to add more guns to the situation. I don’t see why we can’t look to other developed nations for solutions to this problem. General Convention, Schentrups deliver emotional plea to end gun violence Parents of young Episcopalian killed in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre address convention prayer service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishops United Against Gun Violence, July 9, 2018 at 12:05 am I thought the highlight of the morning was Abigail Zimmerman. What an amazing young lady and wonderful family. She demonstrated incredible poise and maturity far beyond her years, spoke with empathy and passion, and continues to provide witness in the heart of Texas, even when it is difficult. She is simply amazing. Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 8, 2018 at 11:03 pm The act of a monstrously evil man combined with the inaction, negligence and cowardice of others including law enforcement and educational institutions created this tragedy. The firearm was merely an inanimate instrumentality. Let us place the blame where it belongs, not on the firearm. It is time to stop using these horrible tragedies as a justification for gun control. The greater good of our society is best served by protecting and strengthening the second amendment. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rev. Dr. James Hargis says: July 8, 2018 at 4:34 pm No one condones gun violence. Everyone wants safe schools, where students can feel secure in their learning process. How do we do it? Not with walk outs, demonstrations, and hijacked incompetent hacks like David Hogg. All this kind of stuff is counterproductive, and serves to alienate, rather than reconcile. We can secure our schools, just as we secure airports, government buildings, etc. There are many viable options. Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Advocacy Peace & Justice, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ PJ Cabbiness says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL July 9, 2018 at 12:28 am Why not? Our lax gun laws allow way too many people to get a gun who should not have a gun. Why can’t we have sensible laws like other developed nations (e.g. Canada, Australia)? Tags Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Matt Ouellette says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 9, 2018 at 12:18 am The right to bear arms is not the necessity to have guns. Guns are simply another instrument to kill someone or something. As a child of God, I am not here to kill anyone or anything. Therefore, I do not need a gun or any instrument of violence. Are not guns weapons of mass destruction?? Yes. Are we not trying to rid our world of such weapons?? Yes. How can we condemn other nations of having/building weapons of mass destruction when we continue to construct such weapons at an alarming rate?? And, I would like to know, who published this statistic that “1 to 2 millions assaults (or worse)” have been prevented by armed citizenry? Oh, yes, that’s the NRA. We talk about “big Pharma” in our opioid epidemic, what about “big Armma” in our killing-epidemic?? Robin Smith says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA July 10, 2018 at 12:49 pm protect and defend the 2nd amendment,make gun ownership rules stricter. Make authority figures such as schoolteachers more able to spot future troublemakers . David Hogg and his ilkare making their own platforms with incompetent methods of walkouts etc which carry no weight with thinking people who are truly concerned Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY July 9, 2018 at 8:10 am No, people can still own guns in Australia, so that is not true. Just like in this country, when they were debating stricter gun laws in Australia after a mass shooting, people were up in arms about how they wanted to take all their guns. However, the laws passed, and the sky didn’t fall. So no, I’m not persuaded by pro-gun arguments that stricter gun laws will lead to confiscation of all guns. That is fear-mongering. And no, the laws on the books that we have are not enough, and even if you’re right that the ones were currently have are not enforced enough, I blame the NRA and other pro-gun groups from allowing them from being enforced (e.g. they basically neutered the ATF). Bill Louis says: By Mike PattersonPosted Jul 8, 2018 Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Philip Schentrup speaks to those attending the public witness against gun violence on July 8. His daughter, Carmen, was among those killed Feb. 14 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. The family, from left, Robert, Evelyn, Philip and April, are members of St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church in Coral Springs, Florida. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] On the gentle slopes of Brush Square Park in downtown Austin and under the canopy of live oak trees, hundreds gathered on July 8 to hear gut-wrenching testimony from Philip and April Schentrup, Episcopalians whose daughter Carmen was one of 17 students and educators killed by a gunman at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.Full ENS coverage of the 79th meeting of General Convention is available here.Standing on a stage surrounded by dozens of bishops, the Schentrups shared their grief and emotional journey in the aftermath of their daughter’s murder on Feb. 14, 2018. “I was unable to talk, unable to eat, unable to sleep, barely able to carry on,” Philip Schentrup said as his wife April, son Robert, and daughter Evelyn, stood at his side.“I was filled with anger and despair,” he said. “Why would God take my daughter from my family? Why would God take one of the most incredible people I’ve ever known? Why would God inflict so much pain and suffering?”Carmen was shot four times with an AR-15 rifle by Nikolas Cruz, a 19-year-old former student who walked into the school building, killed 16 others and wounded another 17. The Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting is one of the deadliest school shootings in U.S. history.Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, one of the organizers of Bishops United Against Gun Violence, shows one of the crosses being distributed to remember the 96 people who die from gun violence every day in the United States. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Episcopal News ServiceThe Schentrups were invited to speak by Bishops United Against Gun Violence, an organization comprised of 80 Episcopal bishops working to curtail gun violence in the United States. The bishops are in Austin to attend the nearly two-week 79th General Convention, a span during which another 1,000 are expected to suffer from gun violence.Schentrup led the bishops and spectators through the crisis of faith caused “by the evil that had been wrought on my family.”“I searched for an answer to this senselessness and questioned everything,” he said, as Presiding Bishop Michael Curry listened in the background. “The world was upside down, and my once boundless sense of hope and happiness was destroyed by a monster.”Finally, he said, “I had what I believe is a moment of inspired reflection. I understood at that moment that I had it all wrong. God did not intend to inflict deep and lasting damage on my family. God is saddened by Carmen’s murder and all the violence that people are allowed to inflict on one another. God weeps for all of his children.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry speaks to the crowd, as April and Philip Schentrup look on. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Episcopal News ServiceSchentrup said that “God gave us free will, the ability to do good, to be complacent, to inflict harm. God gave us the prophets, his son and the Holy Spirit to show us the way. God wants us all to live into his path of love and kindness. I realized that God’s plan was simple. He gave us the ability to choose to love and to care for one another, and he taught us how to do it.“Evil and violence happen in this world because we allow it, not because God allows it,” he said. “We suffer violence because we collectively allow it. God is waiting for us to choose to make the world he wants.”Although a daunting challenge, Schentrup said, “I have hope. I hope in Jesus. I have hope in the hearts and the humanity of people. I have hope that just as people of faith led the fight to overcome segregation, laws that demean people, through love we can end senseless violence.“I ask everyone here to step up, to choose to make the world a better place and then to act,” he said.April Schentrup wipes away tears as she speaks about her daughter, Carmen, who was killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, on Feb. 14. With her are her son Robert, daughter Evelyn, and husband Philip. The family are members of St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church in Coral Springs, Florida. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Episcopal News ServiceFollowing her husband’s remarks, April Schentrup told the crowd that as a nation “we have stood by and listened as others have been gunned down in movie theaters, concert venues, places of worship and offices. The truth is in America gun violence happens every day and devastates families.“We have convinced ourselves that we can’t doing anything to fix it or that it can’t happen to us,” she said. “I’m here to tell you that it can happen.”She said the nation makes guns too easily accessible and “all too easy for those who shouldn’t have them to own them. Gun manufactures have made weapons and arsenals so destructive than anyone can cause severe devastation within a matter of seconds.”Schentrup said she is an “advocate for change. Gun violence is a complex issue that will take more than just thoughts and prayers. It will take many working hands and strong voices. Enough is enough.”Abigail Zimmerman, a member of St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, Waco, Texas, talks about the school walk-out she helped organize in response to the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Looking on are Philip Schentrup, left, whose daughter was killed in that shooting, and Bishop Mark Beckwith of Newark. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Episcopal News ServiceAbigail Zimmerman, a ninth-grader and Episcopalian from Waco, Texas, who co-led a school walkout March 14 in response to the Parkland massacre, told the bishops and audience that young people have “grown up as shooting after shootings after shooting have plagued our country and we have had enough gun violence.”Since the Dec. 14, 2012, Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in which 20 children and six adults were killed, she said there have been 239 additional school shootings in which 138 people, mostly children, have died. “But this time, the survivors refused to let it continue,” she said. “They found their voices. We found our voice. I found my voice. I wanted to do something, I had to do something.”She and her classmates organized the walk-out at her school on March 14 that drew about 300 students and teachers outside to advocate for an end to gun violence. She encourages requiring universal background checks for gun purchases, banning assault rifles, raising the minimum age to purchase a gun and increasing the funding for mental health and counseling programs in schools.Bishops gather before the start of the public witness against gun violence July 8 in Austin. The event was organized by Bishops United Against Gun Violence. Photo: Lori Korleski Richardson/Episcopal News ServiceAlthough she has had heated arguments with those who oppose her views, Zimmerman vowed, “I know what I am doing will make a difference, and so I persevere. I am determined to make sure that my little brother, my children, my grandchildren will not have to be afraid of going to school.“I encourage all of you to make change happen,” she said. “Educate yourself, your friends. Vote. Join organizations devoted to common sense gun legislation. Write letters. Do whatever you can to make a difference. Change must happen and it must happen now.”— Mike Patterson is a San Antonio-based freelance writer and correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. He is a member of ENS General Convention reporting team and can be reached at [email protected] Matt Ouellette says: George Packer says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Philip Schentrup says: Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Matt Ouellette says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Susan Salisbury says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 9, 2018 at 8:39 am Speaking only for myself, I find it disturbing that in this forum we are arguing about and citing the 2nd Amendment when it might be appropriate to be asking ourselves and one another what the Gospel says about this issue. Somehow I don’t think Jesus would be advocating personal ownership of weapons of mass destruction. But as I said, that’s just me. However, the last time I looked, the Constitution of the United States had not been included within the canon of Holy Scripture. Rector Washington, DC Rev. Dr. James Hargis says: Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments (15) Submit a Press Release July 10, 2018 at 5:58 am It isn’t the NRA. The number of enforcement actions by the ATF under Obama was half that of the enforcement actions under Bush. Recently a man who made more than 30 straw purchases who resold the guns to people ineligible to buy them received a sentence of a few months in jail. The NRA doesn’t lobby against enforcement of laws and it doesn’t sell guns. As we have seen in London where virtually all ownership of guns by citizens is banned, it doesn’t stop people from committing violent acts. They literally now have stringent regulations on knives. What next, rocks? Guns aren’t the problem. People with mental health issues and who are prone to violence are. It goes all the way back to Cain and able. And a church which has turned itself into a propaganda macjine for the Democrat party has nothing to offer. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. July 9, 2018 at 6:24 am There are many, many gun control laws already on the books. Everyone purchasing a gun legally must go through a background check. Some states have even more stringent requirements before anyone is allowed to purchase a gun. Can you point out an absurd gun law?Australia has confiscated all guns. It is virtually illegal in Australia to possess a firearm unless except in very special cases. What you are promoting is gun confiscation.What we need is better mental health care. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 10, 2018 at 8:23 pm I think David Hogg and other shooting survivors are doing good work and I’m glad they are drawing attention to the issue of gun violence in our country. Rector Shreveport, LA Gun Violence Rector Bath, NC July 9, 2018 at 12:27 am I don’t think the Parkland students are incompetent at all. I think their protests are continuing to shine a light on the absurd gun laws in our country. Why can’t we have sensible gun control like the rest of the developed world? Countries like Canada and Australia have sensible laws regulating guns and they have not devolved into dictatorships. In fact, their gun violence is MUCH lower than us as a result. General Convention 2018, Rector Belleville, IL July 8, 2018 at 4:40 pm Taking away guns from law abiding citizens is not an answer. Nor is weakening/eliminating our 2nd Amendment. Arming trained volunteer staff, as well as having armed security staff on site, are worthy options to be explored. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA July 8, 2018 at 11:35 pm A complex problem beyond simple solutions. I wish we could focus on ALL violence (spiritual root), not just gun violence (the means). 97% of mass shootings happen in gun free (imaginary) zones and the media and internet with all the attractive attention grooms future perpetrators from an unstable population. The PROMISE Program disallowed the Stoneman shooter’s record of assaults to be placed in his criminal record so there was no deterrent to be found when the NICS check was run. Assault rifles are automatic weapons and already banned. The Armalite (AR) frame is a semi-automatic rifle (one shot per trigger press). Being a licensed therapist as well as a priest I have witnessed that mental health services (spiritual health services too?) are in a shambles. Mentally ill people are often isolated and many do not take the initiative to seek help. Sociologically, the population is so dense today (people rarely know their neighbors) that life has become more impersonal meaning that people are easily lost between the gaps. Prevention is more functional than a cure and both require a stable home environment with a spiritual foundation (The Jesus Movement-thank you PB Curry). The NICS system already exists and works but needs to be tightened up. If you mean a National Gun Registry, that is not the same thing and puts healthy law biding citizens at risk for public disarmament which statistics reveal as more hazardous. Credible, not manipulated, research reveals that armed citizenry have stopped between 1 to 2 million assaults (or worse) a year in most cases without firing a shot. Those numbers alone reveal that a spiritual problem exists due to the number of assaults and intended assaults. I too pray and work for solutions to all violence. Spiritual/mental health with healthy family systems are the the core issue and foundation. Peace. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Mark Bigley says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Matt Ouellette says: Matt Ouellette says: Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

Prince Charles visits churches as part of his summer tour…

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA July 12, 2018 at 12:52 pm Cymru am byth! Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments (1) The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT [Anglican Communion News Service] The Prince of Wales, Prince Charles, has visited a number of Anglican churches as part of his annual summer tour of the country. The Prince of Wales is a title traditionally – but not always – given to the eldest son and heir of the British Monarch. It is largely ceremonial and carries no constitutional authority. In his tour this year Prince Charles visited two churches in St. David’s Diocese and one in St. Asaph, which has within its churchyard a Yew Tree thought to be 5,000 years old.In St. David’s Diocese, he visited St. Jerome’s Church in Llangwm, near Haverfordwest. Here he saw an award-winning tapestry depicting Llangwm’s links with its historic Flemish past and, along with his wife Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, presented an award to parishioner Pam Hunt, whose vision gave rise to the project, in recognize of its imaginative use of digital technology.Full article here. Submit a Press Release Jordan Sakal says: Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Submit a Job Listing Posted Jul 12, 2018 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Prince Charles visits churches as part of his summer tour of Wales Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more