San Diego City Council approves strategic implementation for bicycle master plan

first_img KUSI Newsroom, Carlos Amezcua July 24, 2018 Posted: July 24, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Carlos Amezcua, San Diego City Council approves strategic implementation for bicycle master plan 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Tuesday, the San Diego Bike Coalition applauds City Council for approving the Bicycle Advisory Board’s recommended Strategic Implementation Plan for the Bicycle Master Plan. The master plan identifies high-priority bicycle initiatives such as bikeways, programs and other projects aimed at improving local bicycling infrastructure over 20 years.The implementation plan presents six main objectives, which the Bike Coalition and Bicycle Advisory Board have been working on for the past few years. The objectives call for an increase of mode share of bicycling, along with bike safety and education – specifically in corridors with the highest fatality and injury rates and in historically underserved communities.According to San Diego Bike Coalition Executive Director and Bicycle Advisory Board Chair Andy Hanshaw, City Council’s approval of the Strategic Implementation Plan advances important bicycling infrastructure improvements to align with growing ridership across San Diego Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Happy Death Day 2U review Horrorcomedy keeps dying to reinvent itself

first_imgHappy Death Day 2U, in theatres now, at first aims to expand this concept by trapping bumbling science student Ryan (Phi Vu) into a new time loop, one that Tree and her new boyfriend Carter (Israel Broussard from To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before) aim to stop with the help of students working in the school’s science lab. Unfortunately, the science behind the time loops of both Happy Death Day films is the least interesting part of the films. While alternate dimensions and the multiverse might add great fun to Star Trek: Discovery, Marvel movies and time-travel films like Back to the Future Part II, in Happy Death Day 2U the ideas come across like a dull, sleepy science class. That said, once the science is over, Happy Death Day 2U veers back to its core: telling a ridiculous story full of amusing death sequences and funny banter among characters, a few of whom are as cartoony as ever. As the trailers reveal, Tree gets stuck in a new time loop but with her world remixed, and the movie franchise’s genre along with it. Nearly all of the first movie’s characters return thanks to this premise. Some are totally different, others appear much the same but have different relationships. And instead of necessarily having to solve her own murder, Tree’s trying to figure out whether to restore her original life or embrace a new timeline that feels like an idealized version of her life.Film Title: Happy Death Day 2UCarter (Israel Broussard) and Tree (Jessica Rothe) hope to end the time loop that the latter has been stuck in for two movies. Universal Pictures Seeing all of the characters return and some of the first film’s sequences revisited in a slightly different setting is a plus for anyone who enjoyed the original film, but anyone hopping into 2U without watching the first film will likely lose out on these references.At first glance for fans of the original movie, each of these scenes seems like a re-creation of what was already told the first time. However, thanks to the premise, the twists and deaths keep changing. And unfortunately for Tree, this also means even more dying and reliving the same day over and over — which at this point she handles with expertise during a montage of her killing herself in a variety of ridiculous ways.The film’s third act takes one more genre-hop into becoming a heist film, and with that turn another actress, Rachel Matthews, gets to shine as Danielle, Tree’s attention-demanding frenemy. Matthews brings absurd character acting to a hilarious bait-and-switch scene that nearly steals the spotlight from the entire film.While Happy Death Day 2U can still be classified as a horror film, it clearly doesn’t want to stay in just that genre. Thanks to its lighthearted tone, it’s found a way to reinvent itself again. Should there be a Happy Death Day 3, fans will likely expect the movie to find another way to die and reinvent itself again.See GameSpot’s take on Happy Death Day 2U. 2:33 Jessica Rothe’s Tree returns to Happy Death Day 2U, and she’s still dying all over this film. Universal Pictures With the new horror-comedy Happy Death Day 2U, it’s time to die again, and again, and again, just like in the 2017 movie Happy Death Day it follows. But this time, things are a bit different.Following the Groundhog Day premise of the first movie, the wackier and funnier sequel initially seems like it’ll move the story of Tree (Jessica Rothe) forward from the literal last second of the first film. She spent that whole movie trapped in a time loop on her birthday, getting killed by her jealous college roommate and waking up having to relive the day until she solved the murder. Stream these 2019 Oscar nominees now 19 Photos Hate Valentine’s Day? Watch these streaming movies and TV shows TV and Movies Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: Tags Post a comment 0 Movie reviewslast_img read more

HDFC Bank Q4 net profit rises 18 employee strength falls by 6000

first_imgAn HDFC Bank branch office in Mumbai, October 21, 2015Reuters fileUpdate:HDFC Bank shares were trading with gains of 1.44 percent at Rs 1,483 crore after the private sector lender reported 18.25 percent rise in March 2017 (Q4) net profit to Rs 3,990 crore from Rs 3,374.22 crore for the corresponding period last year. This despite the bank’s provisioning for bad loans spiking by more than 100 percent to Rs 1,262 crore during Q4 from Rs 662 crore in the fourth quarter last fiscal.The number of employees stood at 84,325 as of March 31, 2017, down 6,096 from 90,421 as of December 31, 2016. Net interest income grew 21.1 percent YoY to Rs 12,501 crore from Rs 10,319.2 crore in the year-ago period.Total income stood at Rs 21,560 crore, up 14.3 percent from Rs 18,862 crore, YoY. Other income (non-interest) increased 20.3 percent to Rs 3,446 crore.Gross non-performing assets (NPAs) and net NPAs stood at 1.05 percent and 0.33 percent, respectively, as of March 31, 2017, almost unchanged on a sequential basis but up from 0.94 percent and 0.28 percent, respectively, as of March 31, 2016.The HDFC Bank board recommended a dividend of Rs 11 per equity share, up from Rs 9.50 per share for fiscal 2016.Deposits stood at Rs As of March 31, 2017, the bank had 4,715 branches and 12,260 ATMs.Original story:HDFC Bank were trading with modest gains on Friday ahead of quarterly and full-year results. The scrip was up 0.48 percent at Rs 1,469 on the BSE at around 12.30 pm.The private sector lender’s provisioning for bad loans will be interesting in the context of two other private banks — Yes Bank and IndusInd Bank — earmarking a higher amount for non-perforning assets (NPAs), in line with the RBI’s asset quality review norms.As of December 31, 2016, HDFC Bank’s gross and net NPAs stood at 1.05 percent and 0.3 percent of total advances.Yes Bank, which reported its results recently, had to set aside an additional Rs 228 crore in anticipation of likely losses arising from its exposure to Jaiprakash Associates Ltd.”As of 31 March 2017, the impact of divergences overall is at Rs 1,040 crore on which we have made 25% provisioning. This includes one borrower exposure of Rs 911 crore towards a Delhi-based cement company. However, this is a performing asset which has been servicing interest regularly. We expect to recover the amount in the near term,” Rana Kapoor, MD and CEO of the bank said, without naming the company. The exposure to Jaiprakash Associates and the consequent increase in higher provisioning was also the case for IndusInd Bank. “Provisions were elevated at INR4.3b as they included one-off amount of INR1.22b on a bridge loan for a cement M&A transaction (account remains standard), where the receivable is in June (likely to get reversed in 1QFY18),” brokerage Motilal Oswal Securities said in a note.The optimism for both the banks stems from the fact that Jaiprakash Associates had signed a deal with Aditya Birla Group company Ultratech Cement valued at Rs 16,189 crore for sale of its cement assets.Here is the video clip of HDFC Bank’s concall post declaration of Q3 results:last_img read more

Researchers find tin selenide shows promise for efficiently converting waste heat into

first_img Explore further Working principle of a thermoelectric generator. Credit: (c) Nature, VOL 508, 327 As the planet continues to experience the impact of global warming, scientists around the world frantically pursue alternate ways to produce electricity—one such possibility is to convert waste heat from industrial process into electricity. To make that happen, a thermoelectric generator must be constructed and used. Such generators operate by taking advantage of differences in temperature experienced by a single material. Two thermoelectric semiconductors are exposed to a temperature gradient and are connected together by conducting plates. Thus far, however, the process has not proved to be efficient enough to warrant the expense of building and using such generators, despite doubling in efficiency over just the past fifteen years—from zT 1 to 2.The increase in efficiency has been due mostly to research work involving nanotechnology, and the materials used have generally been based on lead telluride. The difficulty in finding better materials has been stymied by the dual properties required: low thermal conductivity and high electrical conduction. SnSe has been used by scientists for a variety of purposes, but due to its stiff bonds and distorted lattice was not really considered as a possibility. But that was because others had not taken into account the compound’s low anharmonicity. When the team at Northwestern tested it as a possible material for use in a thermoelectric generator they found it had the highest zT ever found, 2.6. © 2014 Phys.org More information: Ultralow thermal conductivity and high thermoelectric figure of merit in SnSe crystals, Nature 508, 373–377 (17 April 2014) DOI: 10.1038/nature13184AbstractThe thermoelectric effect enables direct and reversible conversion between thermal and electrical energy, and provides a viable route for power generation from waste heat. The efficiency of thermoelectric materials is dictated by the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT (where Z is the figure of merit and T is absolute temperature), which governs the Carnot efficiency for heat conversion. Enhancements above the generally high threshold value of 2.5 have important implications for commercial deployment1, 2, especially for compounds free of Pb and Te. Here we report an unprecedented ZT of 2.6 ± 0.3 at 923 K, realized in SnSe single crystals measured along the b axis of the room-temperature orthorhombic unit cell. This material also shows a high ZT of 2.3 ± 0.3 along the c axis but a significantly reduced ZT of 0.8 ± 0.2 along the a axis. We attribute the remarkably high ZT along the b axis to the intrinsically ultralow lattice thermal conductivity in SnSe. The layered structure of SnSe derives from a distorted rock-salt structure, and features anomalously high Grüneisen parameters, which reflect the anharmonic and anisotropic bonding. We attribute the exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivity (0.23 ± 0.03 W m−1 K−1 at 973 K) in SnSe to the anharmonicity. These findings highlight alternative strategies to nanostructuring for achieving high thermoelectric performance.Press release (Phys.org) —A team of researchers working at Northwestern University has found that tin selenide (SnSe) has the highest Carnot efficiency for a thermoelectric cycle ever found, making it potentially a possible material for use in generating electricity from waste heat. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes work they’ve conducted on SnSe and how their discovery might lead to even more efficient materials. Joseph Heremans gives a short history of thermoelectric research in a News & Views companion piece and offers some insights into why SnSe might be so efficient and how it might lead the way to the discovery of even better materials. SnSe is the world’s least thermally conductive crystalline material. Heat cannot travel well through this material because of its very “soft”, accordion-like layered structure which does not transmit vibrations well. It reminds us of the TV commercial for posture-pedic mattress where one can jump up and down on one side of the mattress and a few feet away a glass of wine does not feel the vibrations. By analogy SnSe can get hot on one side and the other side remains cool. The cool side does not feel the vibrations (also known as phonons). In SnSe this means that all heat must go to the other side of the crystal “riding” on the electronic carriers, not lattice vibrations. Thus, the hot carriers can generate useful electricity during their transport. That is enabled by the high thermoelectric power of SnSe. The poor ability to carry heat through its lattice enables the resulting record high thermoelectric conversion efficiency. Credit: Lidong Zhaocenter_img The increase in efficiency is clearly welcome, but is still not enough to revolutionize the field—what might would be the discovery of another material with an even higher efficiency—something that might be similar to SnSe. Journal information: Nature Thermoelectric materials can be much more efficient Citation: Researchers find tin selenide shows promise for efficiently converting waste heat into electrical energy (2014, April 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-tin-selenide-efficiently-electrical-energy.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more