Officer Charged in Death Man Definitely Intended to Shoot

first_imgBy JONATHAN MATTISE, Associated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A White Nashville police officer told investigators that he knew “100 percent” that the Black man he’s charged with fatally shooting intended to shoot at him and possibly others.Prosecutors played the state investigator’s interview with Andrew Delke, 25, in a Nashville courtroom Friday, where dozens of police officers packed in to support Delke. The officers sat across from rows of family members and others there to advocate for Daniel Hambrick, the 25-year-old who died in the shooting as he ran from Delke and held a pistol.Vickie Hambrick, center, mother of Daniel Hambrick, listens during a preliminary hearing for Nashville Police officer Andrew Delke at the Justice A.A. Birch Building Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Delke is charged with criminal homicide for the on-duty shooting of Daniel Hambrick. (George Walker IV/The Tennessean via AP)The shooting death has reignited questions about policing of Nashville’s Black community. The outcry stirred enough support to place a question on the city’s November ballot about creating a citizen oversight board for the police force, and voters approved the measure widely.A judge is considering whether there is probable cause to pass the case on to a grand jury, an early but critical step in the process. Friday’s five-hour hearing on the matter will spill over into Saturday and the judge is expected to make a decision Monday.In his interview, Delke said he relied on his training when Hambrick didn’t heed his instructions to drop the gun, including warning that Delke would otherwise shoot, and the weapon at some point faced the officer.“I said to myself, ‘If I don’t shoot him right now, I’m gonna die,’” Delke said.Assistant district attorney Ronald Dowdy focused on the lack of video footage or witness testimony about Hambrick turning, looking back or aiming his weapon at Delke, as Delke claimed in his interview.During testimony, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation special agent Steven Kennard estimated that Hambrick would have been in a blind spot for about two seconds between cameras that caught the foot chase. Kennard said it would have been “very difficult” to stop, slow down, spin around and face Delke, and then be sprinting again in that timeframe.Questioning by defense attorneys sought to paint scenarios where Hambrick could have had time or a sightline to look back at Delke during that window. They also said that state law allows deadly force by police when they have probable cause that a suspect poses the threat of serious bodily injury to the officer or others.“An officer is not under any obligation to let an armed suspect have the first shot,” defense attorney John Brown said in a line of questioning.According to the arrest affidavit in September, Delke pulled into an apartment parking lot and mistook a different car for one he had been following while looking for stolen vehicles and known juvenile offenders, though he found the car wasn’t stolen. Several people were in the area as Delke stopped nearby, one of them Hambrick, who began to run, the affidavit says.Delke chased Hambrick and yelled at him to stop, though the officer didn’t know the fleeing man’s identity, the affidavit says. Delke believed Hambrick may have been connected to the car Delke misidentified, but didn’t know for sure, the affidavit says.The affidavit says Delke shot Hambrick in the back, torso and the back of his head. A fourth shot missed him.Hambrick’s mother started crying and briefly left the courtroom after prosecutors played surveillance footage of the shooting.last_img read more

Local Boys Candle Business Expanding to Macys

first_imgBy Lenore T. Adkins, Special to the AFROWhen three of Celena Gill’s sons asked her to buy them a Nerf gun and more than $500 in video games, she told them to get a job or start a business. She was only kidding. But her sons, Collin, 14, Ryan, 11, and Austin, 8, they took her words to heart and launched Frères Branchiaux Candle Co. in October 2017 to make soy and vegetable wax candles, room sprays, diffusers, soaps and bath bombs out of the home they share with their parents in Prince George’s County. Young entrepreneurs Ryan Gill, Collin Gill and Austin Gill with their candles. (Courtesy Photo)Frères Branchiaux means “Gill Brothers” in French — Collin is already fluent in the language while his younger brothers are studying it. “We wanted to do Gill Brothers Candle Company, but there’s Gill Brothers’ Trucking, Gill Brothers Air Support,” Ryan Gill explains.   In the 22 months since they started their company, the boys have sold more than 10,000 units — candles are their top-selling product and range between $18 and $36. “It’s really all word of mouth,” Celena Gill told the AFRO. “Like, I rarely reach out to people.” They’re already selling their products in more than 30 stores and they’re looking to expand.  Starting in November, their products will be sold on The Workshop at Macy’s alumni e-commerce site, confirms Katelyn Yannie, Macy’s manager of Northeast Relations. And the brothers are raising $20,000 on gofundme.com to buy a truck that’ll serve as a mobile store for their business. This will make it easier for them to sell their wares at various events. “It’s easier than a van and we … don’t have to pack the candle stuff in it,” Ryan Gill explained. The truck would also double as a mobile training center where the boys could help coordinate job training for homeless trying to get back on their feet or as a hub for the brothers to pass on their entrepreneurial skills to various youth groups and schools. As it is, they donate 10 percent of their profits to the homeless.The boys settled on making candles not only because their mother loves burning in the house, but also because her research found candles are the most successful kiddie business, Celena Gill said. They started out experimenting with candle making using formulas their mother brought back from a candle class that her friend and soror Danita Nikki Brooks, founder of Zen in a Jar, a home and body care line, ran. Then Celena Gill went to a pro candle maker workshop to learn more techniques that helped her boys learn little tweaks. “Making candles is purely science,” Celena Gill said. “Everything matters, whether your candle cannot burn or (if) it’ll blow up. It’s a very deliberate product because you can burn someone’s house down.”  The boys made candles as a lesson in school — Celena Gill homeschools her younger sons and Collin Gill will soon begin his freshman year at St. John’s College High School in Washington, D.C.After about two weeks, they were ready to start selling, Celena Gill said. The boys have made more than enough to buy all the things they wanted and then some. They earned six figures for their work last year and are on pace to double that in 2019, their mother says.At the time the boys launched their business, their mother was already selling inspirational T-shirts, mugs, lapel pins and pillows through her website, Celena Gill Design and she did pop-ups as well. Meanwhile, her husband, Patrick Gill sells personal care and beard products for men through his company, Black Oak Grooming. “All of us do something,” she told the AFRO. In those early days, the boys relied on their family members, as well as their parents’ friends, school and business contacts, fraternity brothers and sorority sisters.Looking to the future, the boys plan to focus more on the retail end of their business and training other kids to become entrepreneurs. “If they don’t want to do it, you can’t make them if the effort isn’t there,” Celena Gill said of kids thinking about opening their own business. “Some people love working nine to five and there’s nothing wrong with that.”last_img read more

Extending this programme to boys effectively pro

first_img“Extending this programme to boys, effectively protects both men and women, making cervical cancer and other HPV diseases a thing of the past.“The Department should give further consideration to a one off ‘catch-up’ scheme for boys still in school who would benefit from vaccination. “It’s important we do all we can to eradicate these conditions.“Last year I had written to the Permanent Secretary for Health, Richard Pengelly urging him to replace the FOB test with the more accurate FIT bowel screening. “We know that if detected early this disease is both treatable and curable; so I am pleased to see the hard-fought efforts of campaigners come to fruition with the Department’s commitment to FIT.“For too long Northern Ireland has lagged far behind its counterparts on these vitally important issues- whilst the introduction of both these initiatives is welcome it is long overdue. “The next step now is to secure a cancer strategy. “At the risk of repetition, the importance of a functioning government cannot be overstated- the earlier we can intervene on this issues, the more lives we can save,” added Mr Durkan.Durkan welcomes HPV vaccine for boys and FIT bowel screening was last modified: April 8th, 2019 by John2John2 Tags: SDLP Health Spokesperson Mark H Durkan has welcomed the announcement from the Department of Health, that FIT screening for bowel cancer and HPV vaccine for boys age 12-13, will be made available in Northern Ireland as soon as next year.The Foyle MLA said: “I am delighted to see progress in the fight against cancer with the introduction of these two important initiatives and pleased to have played a small part in campaigning for these lifesaving improvements and ensuring their introduction here.“We have seen huge successes under the girls’ HPV programme which has already reduced HPV related diseases here, in particular the cancer-causing types. ShareTweet DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHDurkan welcomes HPV vaccine for boys and FIT bowel screeningFOYLE MLAHPV programmeMark H DurkanSDLPlast_img read more