Rock Church buys property of former Midway District strip club

first_imgRock Church buys property of former Midway District strip club Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Sasha Foo Posted: August 2, 2018 Updated: 7:28 PMcenter_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — One of San Diego’s biggest churches has acquired a new property. The Rock Church has purchased the building that used to be known as “The Body Shop” in the Midway District.After 50 years in operation, the club closed last December and the property was put on the market. The Rock Church and a group of investors purchased the building a few months ago for $1.2 million.By purchasing the property, Pastor Miles McPherson said he was able to keep it out of the hands of buyers who would have opened another adult entertainment club. “There were other bids to make it a strip club,” McPherson said.The building in its present condition needs a lot attention, but the transformation that will occur here is also metaphoric.When the stage is removed and the poles are gone, there will be a clean slate, offering an array of possibilities.The Rock Church has not determined how it will use the building, but according to McPherson, “We can use it to help correct some of the ills that happened here and use it to do counseling for marriages, we can use it to treat sexual addiction, we can have church here on Sunday, counseling, job training; all kinds of things to help people renovate their lives.”Sheri Brown, who founded a ministry that reaches out to women who work in the adult entertainment industry was also excited.“I’d love to make this a hope center for women, so for me, it’s amazing – an actual place they can come, that’s kind of like the church outside of the church.”While this property has switched hands, signaling one kind of transformation, the entire Midway District is primed for even bigger changes that will revitalize the area.Next month, a proposal for an update to the Midway District’s community plan will be presented to the city, with recommendations for development, and creating more parks, open space and family friendly housing.The community plan for the area has not updated since 1989. August 2, 2018 Sasha Foo, last_img read more

Researchers find tin selenide shows promise for efficiently converting waste heat into

first_img Explore further Working principle of a thermoelectric generator. Credit: (c) Nature, VOL 508, 327 As the planet continues to experience the impact of global warming, scientists around the world frantically pursue alternate ways to produce electricity—one such possibility is to convert waste heat from industrial process into electricity. To make that happen, a thermoelectric generator must be constructed and used. Such generators operate by taking advantage of differences in temperature experienced by a single material. Two thermoelectric semiconductors are exposed to a temperature gradient and are connected together by conducting plates. Thus far, however, the process has not proved to be efficient enough to warrant the expense of building and using such generators, despite doubling in efficiency over just the past fifteen years—from zT 1 to 2.The increase in efficiency has been due mostly to research work involving nanotechnology, and the materials used have generally been based on lead telluride. The difficulty in finding better materials has been stymied by the dual properties required: low thermal conductivity and high electrical conduction. SnSe has been used by scientists for a variety of purposes, but due to its stiff bonds and distorted lattice was not really considered as a possibility. But that was because others had not taken into account the compound’s low anharmonicity. When the team at Northwestern tested it as a possible material for use in a thermoelectric generator they found it had the highest zT ever found, 2.6. © 2014 Phys.org More information: Ultralow thermal conductivity and high thermoelectric figure of merit in SnSe crystals, Nature 508, 373–377 (17 April 2014) DOI: 10.1038/nature13184AbstractThe thermoelectric effect enables direct and reversible conversion between thermal and electrical energy, and provides a viable route for power generation from waste heat. The efficiency of thermoelectric materials is dictated by the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT (where Z is the figure of merit and T is absolute temperature), which governs the Carnot efficiency for heat conversion. Enhancements above the generally high threshold value of 2.5 have important implications for commercial deployment1, 2, especially for compounds free of Pb and Te. Here we report an unprecedented ZT of 2.6 ± 0.3 at 923 K, realized in SnSe single crystals measured along the b axis of the room-temperature orthorhombic unit cell. This material also shows a high ZT of 2.3 ± 0.3 along the c axis but a significantly reduced ZT of 0.8 ± 0.2 along the a axis. We attribute the remarkably high ZT along the b axis to the intrinsically ultralow lattice thermal conductivity in SnSe. The layered structure of SnSe derives from a distorted rock-salt structure, and features anomalously high Grüneisen parameters, which reflect the anharmonic and anisotropic bonding. We attribute the exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivity (0.23 ± 0.03 W m−1 K−1 at 973 K) in SnSe to the anharmonicity. These findings highlight alternative strategies to nanostructuring for achieving high thermoelectric performance.Press release (Phys.org) —A team of researchers working at Northwestern University has found that tin selenide (SnSe) has the highest Carnot efficiency for a thermoelectric cycle ever found, making it potentially a possible material for use in generating electricity from waste heat. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes work they’ve conducted on SnSe and how their discovery might lead to even more efficient materials. Joseph Heremans gives a short history of thermoelectric research in a News & Views companion piece and offers some insights into why SnSe might be so efficient and how it might lead the way to the discovery of even better materials. SnSe is the world’s least thermally conductive crystalline material. Heat cannot travel well through this material because of its very “soft”, accordion-like layered structure which does not transmit vibrations well. It reminds us of the TV commercial for posture-pedic mattress where one can jump up and down on one side of the mattress and a few feet away a glass of wine does not feel the vibrations. By analogy SnSe can get hot on one side and the other side remains cool. The cool side does not feel the vibrations (also known as phonons). In SnSe this means that all heat must go to the other side of the crystal “riding” on the electronic carriers, not lattice vibrations. Thus, the hot carriers can generate useful electricity during their transport. That is enabled by the high thermoelectric power of SnSe. The poor ability to carry heat through its lattice enables the resulting record high thermoelectric conversion efficiency. Credit: Lidong Zhaocenter_img The increase in efficiency is clearly welcome, but is still not enough to revolutionize the field—what might would be the discovery of another material with an even higher efficiency—something that might be similar to SnSe. Journal information: Nature Thermoelectric materials can be much more efficient Citation: Researchers find tin selenide shows promise for efficiently converting waste heat into electrical energy (2014, April 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-tin-selenide-efficiently-electrical-energy.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

CM to kick off restoration work of Gandhi Bhavan on Oct 2

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee will be kicking off the restoration work of Gandhi Bhavan and setting up of a museum at Beliaghata on October 2.From the same programme, she will also be laying the foundation stone of Mahatma Gandhi University, which will come up in East Midnapore.It may be recalled that the state government has set up a committee to celebrate the 150th birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi and the Chief Minister is the chairperson of the 46 member committee. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe first meeting of the committee was held on April 23, when a series of decisions were taken. On the same day, the decision of restoring Gandhi Bhavan at Beliaghata was also taken. It was also decided that the restoration work was carried out maintaining the heritage of the building.Sources said that necessary assessment has been carried out to prepare an outline, based on which the restoration work will be carried out.The state government has also taken the initiative to release a booklet called “Father of the Nation” and it will contain speeches of Gandhiji.last_img read more