FDA cites problems at peanut butter plant; recall expanded

first_img FDA outbreak pagehttp://www.fda.gov/oc/opacom/hottopics/salmonellatyph.html#news Also today, FDA officials announced that PCA is expanding its recall to cover all products produced at the plant since Jan 1, 2007. It was unclear, however, what type of testing was initially done and what the chances were of the tests producing false-positive results. The earliest case mentioned in the FDA’s report was in June 2007. Screening tests take about a day, while confirmatory tests take from 3 to 5 days, Besser said. Storage of raw peanuts next to roasted peanuts; sometimes the raw and finished products were visually indistinguishable Also, FDA investigators found mold on the ceiling and walls of the finished product cooler, along with water stains running down from the cooler’s fans, located directly above where the finished products were stored. Also, finished products were stored beneath skylights and ceilings that showed evidence of rainwater leakage. The FDA released its full investigative report on the PCA plant, called form 483, today on its Web site. The report includes a list of observations that Rogers classified as deviations from Good Manufacturing Practices, some of which he said are violations of the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. FDA officials observed several instances in which finished products were vulnerable to contamination, including: The identification of specific Salmonella serotypes should have told the company that there was a problem either with the testing or with the peanuts, he said. “The lack of clarity with regards to these tests really points to a lack of credible information for the entire investigation,” he said. “It’s hard to make decisions if the information is piecemeal or potentially incorrect.” John Besser, PhD, clinical laboratory manager at the Minnesota Department of Health, reviewed the FDA’s investigation report and told CIDRAP News that the company used screening tests in the instances where it detected an unidentified Salmonella serotype and used confirmatory testing methods in the three instances where it identified a serotype. Jan 28, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today released its inspection findings on the Georgia peanut butter plant that has been linked to a nationwide Salmonella outbreak, saying the company shipped products that had initially tested positive for Salmonella and citing various other questionable practices. Clarification needed on test methodsMichael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of CIDRAP News, said that despite dramatic headlines about the PCA releasing products that tested positive for Salmonella, more information is needed about methods the company used in its initial product testing. Cleaning deficit, storage errorsThe FDA report also said the company did not clean the peanut paste production line after Salmonella Typhimurium was found in the paste on Sep 26, 2008. The report said the company did not clean the line until the FDA began inspecting the plant on Jan 9. In a statement yesterday, the American Peanut Council expressed shock that PCA “knowingly released a product with potential salmonella contamination into the food supply, as released by the Food and Drug Administration.” Other developmentsSundlof, director of the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, told reporters yesterday that though investigators have wrapped up their investigation at the plant, the FDA, along with state officials, has visited about 1,000 food manufacturers that used potentially contaminated peanut butter and peanut paste in their products and was still testing products and reviewing distribution records. He said he expects the list of recalled products to expand. Rogers also commented that it “is sometimes possible to get negative and positive results from the same product lot.” Tauxe noted that people with no Internet access can call the CDC hotline at 1-800-232-4636 for information on product recalls. “There is concern of potential Salmonella contamination, including Salmonella strains not associated with the current outbreak,” Dr. Stephen Sundlof of the FDA said at a late afternoon news briefing. But he said the agency has not yet seen any illnesses involving strains other than the outbreak strain, Salmonella Typhimiurium. He said there was not enough information to tell if there was a problem with the confirmatory tests or if the company had inadequate testing procedures. “No matter how you cut it, there was some type of negligence,” Besser said. Placement of pallets of finished product within 3 feet of a cooler floor where authorities isolated Salmonella Mdbandaka In other comments at today’s briefing, Sundlof said the FDA still sees no evidence of any contamination in national name-brand peanut butter. He said national brand manufacturers have assured the agency that they never bought any peanut products from PCA. The report said the facility lacked a ventilation system to prevent potential contamination from airflow from the areas that handled raw peanuts to the finished product areas. Also, some areas of the plant lacked segregation between raw and finished products. At today’s briefing, the FDA’s Rogers said the agency is aware of the labs used by PCA for its internal testing and has no information suggesting problems with the labs or their test results. However, he said that unless there are mitigating circumstances, the practice of releasing a product after first getting a positive test result and then a negative result is not common in the industry and “is certainly a deviation from current Good Manufacturing Practices.” Half of the cases have occurred in children younger than 16, Tauxe reported. He said 108 people have been hospitalized, and eight deaths may be associated with the outbreak, all of them in people older than 59. Michael Rogers, who directs the FDA’s field investigation division, told reporters at a press conference yesterday that FDA investigators found that the Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) plant in Blakely, Ga., detected Salmonella in some of the products it made in 2007 and 2008, but later released them after testing by an outside firm found no contamination in the products. Other findings included product residue buildup on and near production equipment, dirt and grime on washroom equipment and walls, and evidence of roaches in a washroom adjacent to the production and packaging areas. At today’s briefing, Robert Tauxe, MD, MPH, deputy director of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Foodborne, Bacterial, and Mycotic Diseases, said the case count in the outbreak remained at 501 in 43 states, plus one case in Canada. He said the outbreak appears to be ongoing, though the number of new cases has modestly decreased. Osterholm said there was no question that the FDA found Salmonella in the PCA plant. But he said detailed information about the initial tests the company used could help clarify what went wrong and that public health officials need to know if those tests produced true-positive Salmonella findings. That would help clarify whether the company released products it knew might be contaminated, he said. The report says the FDA identified 12 instances in which peanut products tested positive for Salmonella on internal testing between June 2007 and September 2008, but the company then released the products after further testing was negative. Initial testing found Salmonella Typhimurium once, Salmonella Anatum twice, and unspecified strains nine times. “The findings of the FDA report can only be seen as a clear and unconscionable action of one irresponsible manufacturer, which stands alone in an industry that strives to follow the most stringent food safety standards,” said Patrick Archer, president of the trade association. Although the firm recognized that the roasting step was the key to eliminating contamination in raw peanuts, it didn’t verify that the temperature, volume, and belt speed of its roaster were adequate to kill pathogenic bacteria, the report said, adding that temperature documentation was incomplete for several time periods. FDA officials told CIDRAP News that an independent private laboratory conducted PCA’s initial testing, but that the FDA didn’t have any information on the testing methods used. Storage of finished products within 15 feet of a floor crack where investigators isolated Salmonella Senftenberg See also: Given the expanded PCA recall, the FDA expects that food companies will check their supply chains to determine if they have products on the market containing ingredients covered by the expanded recall, Sundlof said. He advised consumers to check the FDA’s Web site to see which products have been recalled and said if they are unsure whether a peanut-containing product is potentially contaminated, they should avoid eating it or feeding it to pets. American Peanut Council statementhttp://admin.peanutsusa.com/documents/Document_Library/FDA%20Report%20Reaction%20-%201%2027%2009%20FINAL.pdflast_img read more

Update on the latest sports

first_img Associated Press July 16, 2020 Update on the latest sports Del Mar cancels weekend racing because of jockey positivesDEL MAR, Calif. (AP) — Del Mar has canceled racing for the upcoming weekend after 15 jockeys tested positive for COVID-19. All the track’s riders and personnel who work in the jockeys’ room were tested a day earlier by San Diego County public health officials at the request of the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club. Of the 15 positive tests, all were believed to be asymptomatic.Contact tracing procedures are underway. All but one of the riders who tested positive rode at the recently concluded Los Alamitos meet in Orange County. The mass testing was ordered by the track after jockeys Flavien Prat and Victor Espinoza tested positive. They are both quarantining at home. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditVIRUS OUTBREAK-COLLEGE SPORTSAAC releases testing requirementsUNDATED (AP) — The American Athletic Conference will require all its schools to test football players for COVID-19 at least 72 hours before competition. The track isn’t identifying any of the other riders. However, some have confirmed their own cases.VIRUS OUTBREAK-SOCCERRussian league game called offSOCHI, Russia (AP) — A top-division Russian soccer game has been called off after nine people at FC Sochi tested positive for the virus.The Russian Premier League says Sochi’s game against Tambov will not take place as scheduled on Thursday. The league hasn’t said how many of the nine are players.center_img The Athletics Integrity Unit says Stevens was unavailable for giving samples three times in 2019 in Oregon and West Hollywood. Three whereabouts violations within one year can lead to a ban. The 25-year-old American runner’s ban was backdated to start on Feb. 17, 2020. It expires days after the postponed Tokyo Olympics in August 2021. At her disciplinary hearing, Stevens cited issues with her telephone to explain why samples collection officials were unable to contact her for two of the missed visits. Stevens placed 7th in the 200-meter final at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics, and 5th at the 2017 world championships in London.VIRUS OUTBREAK-HORSE RACING-DEL MAR The announcement by the American comes ahead of the expected release of recommendations from the NCAA. The Power Five conferences have been working toward a minimum standard for testing throughout major college football. AAC Commissioner Mike Aresco says the testing protocols will apply throughout the regular and bowl seasons. More operational protocols are still being finalized, as are testing protocols for other sports.MISSED TESTS-STEVENSAmerican sprinter Stevens banned 18 months for missed testsGENEVA (AP) — Olympic finalist sprinter Deajah Stevens has been banned for 18 months for missing doping tests and will miss the Tokyo Games. There was no mention of whether the game could be rescheduled. The league is scheduled to finish its season next Wednesday.JOE McKNIGHT KILLEDNew trial granted for McKnight’s convicted killerGRETNA, La. (AP) — The killer of former NFL player Joe McKnight will get a new trial. An appeals court vacated the Louisiana man’s 30-year sentence and manslaughter conviction because it was delivered by a split jury. Ronald Gasser was found guilty by a 10-2 vote of fatally shooting McNight during an act of road rage in 2016. Louisiana’s 5th Circuit Court of Appeal vacated that conviction because the U.S. Supreme Court outlawed split-jury verdicts in April. Gasser said he shot McKnight in self-defense after a 5-mile chase led to an altercation. McKnight played three seasons for the New York Jets and one with the Kansas City Chiefs.last_img read more

1990 World Cup: Cameroon became first African nation to reach the quarter finals

first_img Tags: World Cup 1990 The 1990 FIFA World Cup was the 14th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football world championship tournament. It was held from 8 June to 8 July 1990 in Italy, the second country to host the event twice (the first being Mexico in 1986).World Cup 1990 logo116 teams entered the 1990 World Cup, including Italy as host nation and Argentina as reigning World Cup champions, who were both granted automatic qualification. Thus, the remaining 22 finals places were divided among the continental confederations, with 114 initially entering the qualification competition. Due to rejected entries and withdrawals, 103 teams eventually participated in the qualifying stages.Thirteen places were contested by UEFA teams (Europe), two by CONMEBOL teams (South America), two by CAF teams (Africa), two by AFC teams (Asia), and two by CONCACAF teams (North and Central America and Caribbean). The remaining place was decided by a play-off between a CONMEBOL team and a team from the OFC (Oceania).Both Mexico and Chile were disqualified during the qualification process; the former for fielding an overage player in a prior youth tournament, the latter after goalkeeper Roberto Rojas faked injury from a firework thrown from the stands, which caused the match to be abandoned. Chile were also banned from the 1994 qualifiers for this offence.Three teams qualified for the first time: Costa Rica, the Republic of Ireland and the United Arab Emirates.the two finalists line up at the 1990 World CupThe tournament generated a record low goals-per-game average and a then-record of 16 red cards were handed out. In the knockout stage, many teams played defensively for 120 minutes, with the intention of trying their luck in the penalty shoot-out, rather than risk going forward. Two exceptions were the eventual champions West Germany and hosts Italy, the only teams to win three of their four knockout matches in normal time. There were four penalty shoot-outs, a record subsequently equalled in the 2006 and 2014 tournaments. Eight matches went to extra time, a record equalled in the 2014 tournament.Ireland and Argentina were prime examples of this trend of cautious defensive play; the Irish scored just twice in five games in drawing all their matches until their defeat to Italy in the quarter-finals. Losing finalists Argentina, meanwhile, scored only five goals in the entire tournament (a record low for a finalist). Argentina also became the first (and so far only) team to advance twice on penalty shoot-outs and the first team to fail to score and have a player sent off in a World Cup final.Largely as a result of this trend FIFA introduced the back-pass rule in time for the 1994 tournament to make it harder for teams to time-waste by repeatedly passing the ball back for their goalkeepers to pick up. Three, rather than two points would be awarded for victories at future tournaments to help further encourage attacking play.Cameroon reached the quarter-finals, where they were narrowly defeated by England. They opened the tournament with a shock victory over reigning champions Argentina, before topping the group ahead of them, Romania and European Championship runners-up the Soviet Union. Their success was fired by the goals of Roger Milla, a 38-year-old forward who came out of international retirement to join the national squad at the last moment after a personal request from Cameroonian President Paul Biya. Milla’s four goals and flamboyant goal celebrations made him one of the tournament’s biggest stars as well as taking Cameroon to the last eight. Most of Cameroon’s squad was made up of players who played in France’s premier football league, Ligue 1- French is one of the officially spoken languages in Cameroon, it being a former French territory. In reaching this stage, they had gone further than any African nation had ever managed in a World Cup before; a feat only equalled twice since (by Senegal in 2002 and Ghana in 2010). Their success was African football’s biggest yet on the world stage and FIFA subsequently decided to allocate the CAF qualifying zone an additional place for the next World Cup tournament.Cameroon became first African nation to reach World Cup Quarter FinalsDespite the performances of nations such as Cameroon, Colombia, Ireland, Romania and Costa Rica, the semi-finalists consisted of Argentina, England, Italy and West Germany, all previous World Cup winners, with a total of eight previous titles between them. After the 1970 tournament, this is only the second time in the history of the World Cup this has occurred. The teams which finished first, second and third had also contested both the two previous World Cup Finals between themselves.Round of 16Two of the ties – Brazil vs Argentina and Italy vs Uruguay – pitted former champion countries against each other and West Germany met the Netherlands in a rematch of the 1974 World Cup.The all-South American game was won for Argentina by a goal from Claudio Caniggia with 10 minutes remaining after a run through the Brazilian defence by Diego Maradona and an outstanding performance from their goalkeeper Sergio Goycochea. It would later come to light that Branco had been offered water spiked with tranquillisers by Maradona and Ricardo Guisti during half time, to slow him down in the second half. Initially discredited by the press, Branco would be publicly proven right years later, when Maradona confessed the episode in a TV show in Argentina.[25] As for Italy, a strong second half showing saw the hosts beat Uruguay 2–0, thanks to another goal from Schillaci and one from Aldo Serena.The match between West Germany and the Netherlands was held in Milan, and both sides featured several notable players from the two Milanese clubs (Germans Andreas Brehme, Lothar Mathaus and Jurgrn Klinsmann for Internazionale, and Dutchmen Marco Van Basten, Ruud Gullit and Frank Rijkaard for Milan). After 22 minutes Rudi Voller and Rijkaard were both dismissed after a number of incidents (including Rijkaard spitting on Völler) between the two players left the Argentine referee with no option but to send them both off. As the players walked off the pitch together, Rijkaard spat on Völler a second time. Early in the second half, Jurgen Klinsmann put the West Germans ahead and Andreas Brehme added a second with eight minutes left. A Ronald Koeman penalty for the Netherlands in the 89th minute narrowed the score to 2–1 but the Germans saw the game out to gain some revenge for their exit to the Dutch in the previous European Championship.Meanwhile, the heroics of Cameroon and Roger Milla continued in their game with Colombia. Milla was introduced as a second-half substitute with the game goalless, eventually breaking the deadlock midway in extra time. Three minutes later he netted a second after Colombian goalkeeper, Rene Higuita was dispossessed by Milla while well out of his goal, leaving the striker free to slot the ball into the empty net. Though the deficit was soon reduced to 2–1, Cameroon held on to become the first African team ever to reach the World Cup quarter-finals. Costa Rica were comfortably beaten 4–1 by Czechoslovakia, for whom Tomas Skuhravy scored the tournament’s second and final hat-trick.The Republic of Ireland’s match with Romania remained goalless after extra time and the Irish side won 5–4 on penalties. David O’Leary converted the penalty that clinched Ireland’s place in the quarter-finals. Ireland thus became the first team since Sweden in 1938 to reach the last eight in a World Cup finals tournament without winning a match outright. Yugoslavia beat Spain 2–1 after extra time, with GDragan Stojkovic scoring both the Yugoslavs’ goals. England were the final qualifier against Belgium, as midfielder David Platt’s’s swivelling volley broke the stalemate with the game moments away from a penalty shoot-out.Quarter-finalsThe first game of the last 8 saw Argentina and a Yugoslav side, reduced to 10 men after only half an hour, play out a goalless stalemate. The holders reached the semi-finals after winning the penalty shoot-out 3–2, despite Maradona having his penalty saved. A second Argentine miss (by Pedro Troglio) looked to have eliminated them until goalkeeper Serfio Goycochea – playing because first choice Nery Pumpido broke his leg during the group stage – rescued his side by stopping the Yugoslavs’ final two spotkicks.The Republic of Ireland’s World Cup run was brought to an end by a single goal from Schillaci in the first half of their quarter-final with hosts Italy. West Germany beat Czechoslovakia with a 25th minute Lothar Mathaus penalty.The quarter-final between England and Cameroon was the only quarter-final to produce more than one goal. Despite Cameroon’s heroics earlier in the tournament, David Platt put England ahead in the 25th minute. At half-time, Milla was brought on. In the second half, the game was turned on its head during a five-minute stretch: first Cameroon were awarded a penalty from which Emmanel Kunde scored the equaliser; then in the 65th minute Eugene Ekeke put Cameroon ahead. Cameroon came within eight minutes of reaching the semi-finals before then they conceded a penalty, which Gary Lineker converted. Midway through extra time, England were awarded another penalty and Lineker again scored from the spot. England were through to the semi-finals for the first time since the days of Bobby Moore 24 years ago.Semi-finalsThe first semi-final featured the host nation, Italy, and the world champions, Argentina in Naples. ‘Toto’ Schillaci scored yet again to put Italy ahead in the 17th minute, but Claudio Caniggia equalised midway through the second half, breaking Walter Zenga’s clean sheet streak throughout the tournament. There were no more goals in the 90 minutes or in extra time despite Maradona (who played for Naples in Serie A at the time) showing glimpses of magic, but there was a sending-off: Ricardo Guisti of Argentina was shown the red card in the 13th minute of extra time. Argentina went through on penalties, winning the shoot-out 4–3 after more heroics from Goycochea.The semi-final between West Germany and England at Juventus’s home stadium in Turin was goalless at half-time. Then, in the 60th minute, a shot from Andreas Brehme was deflected by Paul Parker into his own net. England equalised with ten minutes left; Gary Lineker was the scorer. The game ended 1–1. Extra time yielded more chances. Klinsmann was guilty of two glaring misses and both sides struck a post. England had another Platt goal disallowed for offside. The match went to penalties, and West Germany went on to win the shoot-out 4–3.Third-place matchThe game saw three goals in a 15-minute spell. Roberto Baggio opened the scoring after a rare mistake by England’s goalkeeper Peter Shilton, in his final game before international retirement, presented a simple opportunity. A header by David Platt levelled the game 10 minutes later but Schilaci was fouled in the penalty area five minutes later, leading to a penalty. Schillaci himself got up to convert the kick to win him the tournament’s Golden Boot for his six-goal tally. Nicola had a goal ruled out minutes later, but the hosts claimed third place. England had the consolation prize of the Fair Play award, having received no red cards and the lowest average number of yellows per match.FinalThe final between West Germany and Argentina has been cited as the most cynical and lowest-quality of all World Cup Finals. In the 65th minute, Argentina’s Pdro Monzon was sent off for a foul on Jurgen Klinsmann, the first player ever to be sent off in a World Cup Final.Argentina, weakened by suspension and injury, offered little attacking threat throughout a contest dominated by the West Germans, who struggled to create many clear goalscoring opportunities. The only goal of the contest arrived in the 85th minute when Mexican referee Edgardo Codesal awarded a Penalty to West Germany, after a foul on Rudi Voller by Roberto Sensini leading to Argentinian protests. Andreas Brehme, converted the spot kick to settle the contest. In the closing moments, Argentina were reduced to nine after Gustavo Dezotti received a red card when he hauled Jurgen Kohler to the ground during a stoppage in play. The 1–0 scoreline provided another first: Argentina were the first team to fail to score in a World Cup Final.Germany defeated Argentina to win their third World Cup trophyWith its third title (and three second-place finishes) West Germany – in its final tournament before national re-unification – became the most successful World Cup nation at the time. West German manager Franz Beckenbauer became the only man to both captain (in 1974) and manage a World Cup winning team, and only the second man (after Mario Zagallo of Brazil) to win the World Cup as a player and as team manager. It was also the first time a team from UEFA won the final against a non-European team.Savlatore Schillaci received the Golden Boot award for scoring six goals in the World Cup. This made him the second Italian footballer to have this honour, after Paolo Rossi won the award in 1982.Italy’s Schillaci was top scorer in the 1990 World CupComments last_img read more