Suicide of physician wife confesses to illicit affairs

first_imgMustafa Morshed Akash,Tanjila Haq Chowdhury MituTanjila Haq Chowdhury Mitu, who was detained in connection with reported suicide of her husband physician Mustafa Morshed Akash, has confessed to having extramarital affairs with others, police claimed on Friday, reports UNB.She, however, kept mum about various other important issues, Chittagong Metropolitan Police’s additional deputy commissioner (South) Md Mizanur Rahman said at a press briefing in the city.”She was detained over her husband’s Facebook status before killing himself and his family’s verbal complaint,” Mizanur said.A team of Counter Terrorism and Transnational Crime (CTTC) unit picked Mitu up from Nandankanon on Thursday night, hours after her husband reportedly killed himself with an insulin overdose.A Chattogram court later sent her to jail when police produced her before it showing her arrest in a case filed over the incident.Victim’s mother Jobeda Khanam filed the case against six people, including Mitu, her parents and two friends, with Chandgaon police station in the afternoon, said its officer-in-charge Abul Bashar.The five other accused are Mitu’s father Anisul Haq Chowdhury, mother Shamim Shely, sister Sanjida Haq Chowdhury Alisha and two friends – Indian national Uttam Patel and Mahbubul Alam.Police said they will investigate whether any of Mitu’s friends was involved in the instigation.CTTC unit chief Mohammad Shahidullah said they had interrogated Mitu. “She has admitted to cheating and conjugal disputes but avoided answering some other questions,” he said.Police said they had seized the mobile phone used by Akash and the physician’s Facebook status about his wife has been deleted.Akash, 33, a physician of Chittagong Medical College Hospital’s medicine department, reportedly killed himself over family feud in Chandgaon residential area in the city after an altercation with his wife, also a physician who used to reside in the USA, about her alleged illicit affairs.Family members said before his apparent suicide, Akash had shared photos of his wife on his Facebook profile and wrote about her alleged extramarital affairs before announcing his decision to end his life.last_img read more

15 more jailed in Vietnam over economic zone protests

first_imgA court in Vietnam has handed out prison sentences to 15 protesters arrested during mass demonstrations last month against proposed special economic zones in the Southeast Asian country, state media reported on Tuesday.Despite sweeping reforms, communist-ruled Vietnam tolerates little dissent. The country’s constitution allows freedom of assembly, but protests are often broken up by police.At least 31 people have been jailed for taking part in the nationwide demonstrations, triggered by fears that investors from China would dominate the 99-year land leases up for development in the zones.In a trial which ended late on Monday, the People’s Court of Bien Hoa City, in the south of the country, sentenced the protesters to between eight to 18 months in prison.Five others were given 12- to 14-months probation on charges of “causing public disorder”, Voice of Vietnam Radio said.They were arrested when taking to the streets on 10 June and “caused traffic jams”, the report cited the indictment as saying.Their lawyers were not immediately available for comment.Earlier this month, 16 people were jailed under identical charges in Binh Thuan province. June’s protests had turned violent in the province, with protesters hurling bricks and petrol bombs at police.Monday’s trial came less than two weeks after a court in Ho Chi Minh City ordered the release and deportation of William Anh Nguyen, 32, an American man of Vietnamese descent who was also arrested for “causing public disorder” during the protests.”They have done nothing wrong,” Nguyen wrote on his twitter account after Monday’s sentencing. “The fight for justice and democracy continues”.last_img read more

Researchers find tin selenide shows promise for efficiently converting waste heat into

first_img Explore further Working principle of a thermoelectric generator. Credit: (c) Nature, VOL 508, 327 As the planet continues to experience the impact of global warming, scientists around the world frantically pursue alternate ways to produce electricity—one such possibility is to convert waste heat from industrial process into electricity. To make that happen, a thermoelectric generator must be constructed and used. Such generators operate by taking advantage of differences in temperature experienced by a single material. Two thermoelectric semiconductors are exposed to a temperature gradient and are connected together by conducting plates. Thus far, however, the process has not proved to be efficient enough to warrant the expense of building and using such generators, despite doubling in efficiency over just the past fifteen years—from zT 1 to 2.The increase in efficiency has been due mostly to research work involving nanotechnology, and the materials used have generally been based on lead telluride. The difficulty in finding better materials has been stymied by the dual properties required: low thermal conductivity and high electrical conduction. SnSe has been used by scientists for a variety of purposes, but due to its stiff bonds and distorted lattice was not really considered as a possibility. But that was because others had not taken into account the compound’s low anharmonicity. When the team at Northwestern tested it as a possible material for use in a thermoelectric generator they found it had the highest zT ever found, 2.6. © 2014 Phys.org More information: Ultralow thermal conductivity and high thermoelectric figure of merit in SnSe crystals, Nature 508, 373–377 (17 April 2014) DOI: 10.1038/nature13184AbstractThe thermoelectric effect enables direct and reversible conversion between thermal and electrical energy, and provides a viable route for power generation from waste heat. The efficiency of thermoelectric materials is dictated by the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT (where Z is the figure of merit and T is absolute temperature), which governs the Carnot efficiency for heat conversion. Enhancements above the generally high threshold value of 2.5 have important implications for commercial deployment1, 2, especially for compounds free of Pb and Te. Here we report an unprecedented ZT of 2.6 ± 0.3 at 923 K, realized in SnSe single crystals measured along the b axis of the room-temperature orthorhombic unit cell. This material also shows a high ZT of 2.3 ± 0.3 along the c axis but a significantly reduced ZT of 0.8 ± 0.2 along the a axis. We attribute the remarkably high ZT along the b axis to the intrinsically ultralow lattice thermal conductivity in SnSe. The layered structure of SnSe derives from a distorted rock-salt structure, and features anomalously high Grüneisen parameters, which reflect the anharmonic and anisotropic bonding. We attribute the exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivity (0.23 ± 0.03 W m−1 K−1 at 973 K) in SnSe to the anharmonicity. These findings highlight alternative strategies to nanostructuring for achieving high thermoelectric performance.Press release (Phys.org) —A team of researchers working at Northwestern University has found that tin selenide (SnSe) has the highest Carnot efficiency for a thermoelectric cycle ever found, making it potentially a possible material for use in generating electricity from waste heat. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes work they’ve conducted on SnSe and how their discovery might lead to even more efficient materials. Joseph Heremans gives a short history of thermoelectric research in a News & Views companion piece and offers some insights into why SnSe might be so efficient and how it might lead the way to the discovery of even better materials. SnSe is the world’s least thermally conductive crystalline material. Heat cannot travel well through this material because of its very “soft”, accordion-like layered structure which does not transmit vibrations well. It reminds us of the TV commercial for posture-pedic mattress where one can jump up and down on one side of the mattress and a few feet away a glass of wine does not feel the vibrations. By analogy SnSe can get hot on one side and the other side remains cool. The cool side does not feel the vibrations (also known as phonons). In SnSe this means that all heat must go to the other side of the crystal “riding” on the electronic carriers, not lattice vibrations. Thus, the hot carriers can generate useful electricity during their transport. That is enabled by the high thermoelectric power of SnSe. The poor ability to carry heat through its lattice enables the resulting record high thermoelectric conversion efficiency. Credit: Lidong Zhaocenter_img The increase in efficiency is clearly welcome, but is still not enough to revolutionize the field—what might would be the discovery of another material with an even higher efficiency—something that might be similar to SnSe. Journal information: Nature Thermoelectric materials can be much more efficient Citation: Researchers find tin selenide shows promise for efficiently converting waste heat into electrical energy (2014, April 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-tin-selenide-efficiently-electrical-energy.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Best of Last Week – Philae lands on a comet new way

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A model of Rosetta lander Philae stands on a model of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, at the European Space Agency ESA in Darmstadt, Germany, Wednesday, Nov.12, 2014. Europe’s Rosetta space probe was launched in 2004 with the aim of studying the comet and learning more about one of the biggest questions about the origin of the universe. (AP Photo/Michael Probst) Explore further Citation: Best of Last Week – Philae lands on a comet, new way to generate electricity and long term impact of marijuana use (2014, November 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-week-philae-comet-electricity-term.html X-ray telescopes find black hole may be a neutrino factorycenter_img Another team saw some clues revealed about the planets interior—reexamined, decades-old Voyager 2 data offered evidence of the possibility of an unusual feature hiding deep within the planet. Meanwhile, researchers at Arizona State University found that magnetic fields frozen into some meteorite grains were telling a shocking tale of the birth of the solar system. They suggest that shock waves moving through the material surrounding the early sun had a major impact on how the solar system was formed. And another team working with X-ray telescopes found that a black hole may be a neutrino factory—specifically, the black hole thought to be at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. If the findings prove true, it would be the first time that neutrinos have been traced back to a black hole.In technology news, one team of researchers at the University of Texas announced the development of a lighter, cheaper radio wave device that could transform telecommunications—it’s a radio wave circulator that is both smaller and more efficient than those currently in use and could be used to potentially double the amount of useful bandwidth. Meanwhile, another team working at VTT Technical Research Centre in Finland demonstrated a new technique for generating electricity. In unrelated news, two teams of researchers have confirmed what many have suspected: that a healthy diet is good for the kidneys—and it can even help reverse some cases of kidney disease. And finally, if you’re wondering if smoking weed your whole life might be having an impact, a recent study showed marijuana’s long-term effects on the brain—like smaller brain parts and increased connectivity between other brain areas. They report that it appears likely that there are different impacts depending on when smoking started and how long it has been used. © 2014 Phys.org (Phys.org)—It was a big week for space science, topping the news of course was a European spacecraft landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The spectacular achievement by the washing-machine sized Philae probe was a cosmic first in many ways and resulted in very good data being sent back to Earth before it went silent due to its batteries dying prematurely. Researchers studying Uranus were kept busy as well, as one team was thrilled by extreme storms spotted in the planet’s hazy blue-green atmosphere.last_img read more