Cricket gets fitness and wellness centre

first_imgPresident of the Jamaica Cricket Association (JCA) Wilford ‘Billy’ Heaven is hopeful that the opening of the state-of-the-art fitness and wellness centre at Sabina Park will result in an improvement of the national cricket teams.The fitness centre, which was officially opened on Thursday at Sabina Park by Minister of Sports Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange cost an estimated US$70,000 and was co-funded by the National Health Fund (NHF).”This is an initiative that was contained in this administration’s manifesto over two years ago, and this is a realisation of that commitment,” said Heaven.”It is an achievement of the JCA, and the hope is that it will contribute to the fitness level of our players, which, at the moment, is nowhere near where it should be.”The facility, which will also be open to members of other national associations, as well as sports clubs and schools, consists of a range of equipment and exercise machines.It can hold a capacity of 20 persons at any given time.”The fact that the JCA has chosen to take the matter of health seriously is most worthy of commendation, and, indeed, adulation,” stated Grange, who cut a ribbon to signify the opening.”I must commend the NHF and the CHASE Fund for buying into the vision and providing the funding for this initiative.”Added Grange: “What pleases me most, as well, is that this vision fits into my wider vision for the support of infrastructure, which we, as a Government, must put in place to support our athletes.”ENDORSED BY MINISTRYPermanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health Dr Kevin Harvey, who spoke on behalf of Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton, also hailed the venture.”The ministry has been on a drive to take health to another level, and last year, we launched our workplace policy,” Harvey outlined.This is because, he said, the ministry recognised that several Jamaicans spent a significant portion of their time at work.”We have subsequently been encouraging persons to set up at their workplace wellness centres and areas of opportunity for physical activity,” he said.Meanwhile, Everton Anderson, chief executive officer of the NHF, who presented the JCA with several pamphlets and healthy lifestyle charts for the centre, said that he welcomed the partnership.”We believe that a healthier nation leads to a more productive nation, and when Mr Heaven approached us, we were excited,” said Anderson.”I commend Mr Heaven, and on behalf of the board and management of the NHF, we really are pleased that we were able to contribute to this wellness centre US$50,000.”He added: “We really hope that it will lead to positive outcomes.”last_img read more

Fewer than half of Canadians hold optimistic open view of the world

first_imgOTTAWA – Canada’s reputation as a nation with an open and optimistic world view that flies in the face of rising pessimism and nationalism elsewhere is being challenged by new research.Fewer than half of Canadians appear on the “open” side of an index devised by EKOS Research and The Canadian Press to gauge populist sentiment here.The remainder either have a closed-off view of the world or are on the fence — a potentially volatile swing group.The research aggregated polls involving 12,604 people to explore to what extent Canadians’ views are in line with voters who backed two of the most surprising manifestations of 21st century populism in recent years — Donald Trump’s campaign for U-S president and the exit of Britain from the European Union.Both were understood to be the results of rising discontent among those sideswiped by technological, cultural and economic transformation and seeking to regain some measure of control by eschewing the political status quo in favour of a dramatic new approach.Whether Canada could be facing a similar issue has been a question ever since.The results of the study suggest 46 per cent of Canadians are open-minded towards the world and each other, with the highest numbers found in B-C and the Atlantic provinces.But 30 per cent report feeling economically and culturally insecure, a sentiment found in the largest numbers in Alberta and Saskatchewan.The remainder — roughly 25 per cent — have a mixed view.To gauge where Canadians sit, EKOS Research and The Canadian Press aggregated responses to questions posed in two telephone polls between June and December about people’s perceptions of their economic outlook, class mobility, ethnic fluency and tolerance. Pollsters also asked whether they believed such movements were good or not.The results were in turn plotted on a spectrum from “open” to “ordered” — a new way of classifying people’s political viewpoints that goes beyond the traditional right-versus-left.The telephone polls had a margin of error of 0.9 per cent, 19 times out of 20.—last_img read more