Athletes impress in field events

first_imgWHILE most attention was being focused on track events at last Saturday’s Digicel/PUMA Youngster Goldsmith Classic inside the National Stadium, athletes in the field were making their mark with some strong performances, with Excelsior High’s Shanice Love leading the way.Love, who is conditioned by outstanding throwing coach, Michael Vassell, remained unbeaten this season after a splendid 51.92 metres to win the girls Class One discus.Former Buff Bay High School top female thrower, Fiona Richards, who is now competing for Edwin Allen High, shared the spotlight as she was a double winner. Richards, who will not be eligible for this year’s ISSA Boys and Girls’ Championships, captured the Class Two discus with 48.27m, before winning the shot put with 15.46m.Other outstanding female performances came from Kimberly Lugg of Excelsior and Sanique Burgher of Edwin Allen. Lugg captured the girl’s Class Three discus with 35.00m, while Burgher soared 1.75m in winning the Class Three high jump.Field events could play a major role in deciding the title at Champs this year and many of the top athletes were on show.Calabar High’s Class One thrower, Warren Barrett Jr, stayed unbeaten in the discus and shot put. He easily won the shot put with 19.30m, way ahead of second-place finisher, Vashon McCarthy, of Jamaica College (JC), with 14.86m.UPSETThere was an upset in the boys’ triple jump Open, as Campion College’s Jordan Scott surprised JC’s Obrien Wasome. Scott won with 15.81m, while Wasome had to settle for second with 15.44m.Otherwise, JC showed their strength in the jumps with Clayton Brown getting the better of St Jago High’s Lushane Wilson in the Class One high jump. An event which will be worth going miles to see at Champs, Brown cleared the bar at 2.18m to beat Wilson, 2.15m.Other JC athletes, Paketo Dudley (7.25m) in the Class One long jump and John Mark Rainford, (5.79m) in the Class Three long jump, also won.Kingston College’s Zico Campbell was a double winner in the boys’ Class Two throws. Campbell, formerly of Glenmuir High, took the discus with 53.18m and the shot put with an impressive 17.96m.last_img read more

I want to give more to Jamaica – Powell

first_imgHis time on the track may be winding to a close, but influential Jamaican sprinter Asafa Powell is hoping that when he does hang up his spikes, his time off the track will be largely spent giving back to the society. “It is really amazing, the effect that we (athletes) have on people. There is a lot more that we can do as athletes,” Powell said. “Post retirement, boy, this retirement thing!” Powell laughed. “I really just want to help Jamaica. You have kids coming up who would want to be in my shoes one day and want to be in all the athletes’ shoes, so I am just trying my best to do as much as I can to be a good role model for everyone,” he pointed out. Powell, through his Asafa Powell Foundation (APF) handed over $560,000 to the Kingston Public Hospital (KPH) yesterday. The funds were raised via an online #SpreadABed4KPH crowd funding campaign. “To see that we can stop traffic, crime, everything in maybe nine seconds or whatever time it is … just for us to come together,” he pointed out, while assuring he would like to see social initiatives in the fight against crime. “It’s up to Jamaica and the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association to really form something for the athletes to help a lot more,” he continued. The athlete, who also contributed part of his personal funds from participating at Rio 2016 Olympic Games, said he wants to live a life of making a difference in the country and help with social responsibilities. Powell called it “a great feeling” to give back to Jamaica. “When I am home sitting down, where I go on the balcony and chill, everyone who pass by can see me, they pass by they shout ‘Asafa, Asafa, big up!'” the sprinter reasoned. “The reception I get from people is just amazing, and sometimes I sit back and ask why these people love me so much. It’s just crazy how the people of Jamaica love me. You want that from your country, this is where you should get the love,” he explained. While Powell’s foundation, which was started a few years ago, may have been dormant for some time, Powell said he has changed a few members and will be restarting it in full effect. “We have a lot more things in store. As the years go by, we have a lot more plans and bigger plans.We will re-launch the foundation and will be doing other things,” continued Powell. Speaking of reaching out, the Sub-10 Sprint King said he personally got in touch with American sprinter Tyson Gay, who lost his daughter recently to gun violence in the United States. “Definitely reached out to him. This is something that is so sad and shouldn’t happen to anybody, and I felt really bad knowing he is a fellow competitor of mine. “I reached out to him, and the response that I got is very surprising. I didn’t know he is someone who respected me that much, and now I have a different kind of respect for him now after this tragic incident,’ Powell outlined.last_img read more

Joburg in top 50 commerce hubs

first_img29 November 2007Johannesburg has been ranked 47th out of 50 cities worldwide in a new study of the centres of commerce that shape the global economy.The findings of the study, the MasterCard Worldwide Centres of Commerce Index, were presented in Johannesburg this week.Compiled from research by a panel of eight independent economic, urban development and social science experts from leading academic institutions around the world, the index explores the strategic role that cities play in driving the global economy.Based on six measurement dimensions consisting of over 100 data points, the index assesses the legal and political framework, the economic stability, the ease of doing business, the financial flow, the business centre capabilities, and the knowledge creation and information flow of the world’s 50 leading cities.Occupying first position in the index is London, followed by New York, Tokyo, Chicago and Hong Kong. Completing the top 10 are Singapore, Frankfurt, Paris, Seoul and Los Angeles.Johannesburg’s highest ranking was in the “financial flow” dimension, where the city was ranked 26th. The city also scored high in the “ease of doing business” dimension, where it was ranked 33rd. However, it scored low for “economic stability” and “knowledge creation and information flow”.Speaking at the presentation in Johannesburg, MasterCard Worldwide’s general manager for Africa, Eddie Grobler, said the city’s ranking “demonstrates its position as a continental hub. As the city with the highest ranking in Africa, Johannesburg’s ranking tells an amazing growth story.”Parks Tau, a member of the city’s mayoral committee for finance and economic development, said Johannesburg had increased its capital investment significantly over the past five years.“There has been considerable growth in government-led public investment to support growth in the city, along with a concerted effort by the City, in partnership with the private sector, to develop the city,” Tau said.At the same time, Tau said there were areas where the city could improve, especially public transport. This would change for the better with the introduction of a bus rapid transit system, which would give Johannesburg a “safe and reliable” transport system.Mike Schussler, senior economist at T-Sec, said Johannesburg would also have to improve its knowledge base and its network capabilities if it was to succeed in the broader game of global growth and city wealth.“We do, however, know that between now and 2010, continued capital investment is planned by the City of Johannesburg for areas such as business process outsourcing, tourism and its public transport infrastructure,” Schussler said.“These investments, coupled with increased attention from the City on law enforcement and traffic congestion, will enable Johannesburg to improve its position as a world centre of commerce significantly.”Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

May 25, Dan Uetrecht

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We finished planting around May 12. We have just had exceptional weather. It has almost been a picture perfect planting year. For the first time I can remember, we started planting and we didn’t stop one day until we were finished. We usually have to stop because we get rained out or we get a wetter farm and we have to wait for it to dry out. Everything just went well this year. In the last couple of years we’ve had big rains and we had to replant, but this year everything looks really good. Everything is growing fast. Cutworms and other early problems thrive on the cooler, wetter conditions and we just haven’t had that. The rains have been enough to keep up but it is a concern that the rains have been so scattered. You may see it rain two inches and 10 miles away it is two tenths. We started sidedressing last Wednesday and yesterday we sprayed the wheat with fungicide. The wheat is looking really good and it keeps getting better. It thrives in this dry weather. We started post- spraying beans and touching up some corn. I think the preemerge won’t work quite as well this year because it has been so dry. Wheat is the only crop I continue to use a fungicide on. Wheat is such a quality issue that we try to protect it as much as we can. We just automatically spray our wheat with fungicide because most of it goes to a miller and they need high quality and high test-weight. If you don’t have high quality wheat you can hardly give it away. We just started baling hay. We kept waiting to mow the hay because there was rain in the forecast. We finally got a window and we started baling our hay yesterday and should finish today. I would call it an average first cutting. There wasn’t an overabundance of moisture but it was good and it won’t get rained on. I think we are in really good shape. If we can get some timely rains I think it will set up for a nice year.last_img read more

Publishing Gun-Owner Names: Can Public Information Be Too Public?

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Government#politics#privacy Related Posts On December 23, the Journal News published an interactive map showing the names and addresses of all pistol-permit holders in two New York counties. Some 43,000 comments later, the battle over the paper’s move rages on. Incensed gun owners claimed the article made their homes targets for thieves and drew unwarranted attention to them “like it was some sort of sex offender registry.” More than 20,000 people responded by circulating the author’s address, phone number on social media in a “How do YOU like it?” strategy.It didn’t end there. On January 3, Putnam County officials refused the paper’s request for its pistol permit records, citing the risk of “endangering citizens.”Is it Legal?The fight will probably go to the courts, and the county will probably lose, because the newspaper is perfectly within its legal rights to publish the information. The information was obtained legally, and everything published was available, for free, to any resident who asked.According to Mark Rumold, a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontiers Foundation, the issue is cut-and-dried: “I can say, in no uncertain terms, that publishing the information was legal and squarely protected by the First Amendment. Whether or not publishing the information was the right thing to do, or smart, or in the public interest, is probably a question of journalism ethics that I’m not qualified to answer.”Another criticism – leveled at both the newspaper that published the data and the gun owners who later published the author’s address – is that it’s a question of “intent.” According to that argument, if the intent of the publication was to shame the named parties, the First Amendment doesn’t protect that.Again, Rumold dismisses the argument: “The First Amendment, if it protects anything, certainly protects the publication of truthful, lawfully obtained information about a topic of significant public interest. That protection includes shielding a newspaper from civil liability – for example, for violations of privacy.” He adds that the line gets blurry in some “edge cases,” such as publicizing a rape victim’s name, but, in his opinion, “this case doesn’t even approximate that level of privacy intrusion.” So until someone comes out and says “Let’s all meet at 5pm to steal their guns,” Uncle Sam is fine with it.But Is It Right?As ReadWrite’s Fruzsina Eördögh pointed out in a recent article on minors’ privacy rights, having the ability to do something isn’t a green light to go ahead and do it. Journalists choose not to print information all the time, if they believe that information could cause harm.Legal does not equal ethical.Clearly, the paper published the list to attract readers, and that worked in spades. It’s less obvious that it considered the additional ramifications of its actions. Still, all of the permit holders referenced in the article are over 21 and (one would hope) aware of the fact that their permits were open to the public. If they were not made aware of that fact, the fault lies with the permitting system – not the newspaper. Rumold agrees: “In my opinion, for those upset about the publication of the information, I think their grievance is with New York’s legislature’s for making the information a public record.”What Happens Next?Governing bodies clearly have failed to anticipate the kind of proactive publication modern technology allows. While publishing a database of public information may be perfectly legal, it could very well cause unintended headaches. Over the next few years, we’ll probably see a lot more protections against massive data aggregation pop up in the form of data throttling or outright bans on publication, followed by court challenges to all those moves.We’ll see how that all plays out, but for now, it looks like the press has the advantage.Lead image courtesy of Shutterstock. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img cormac foster Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

Indian designers obsessed with celebrities?

first_imgCelebrity sightings on the runway – a superfluous exercise, or an indicator of a mutually beneficial relationship between designer and star? We find out.One actress, six months, three shows for three different designers. The price – 8-12 lakhs depending on the stature of the designer concerned. Plus the usual trappings. A business-class air ticket, a Mercedes to pick up the star, a suite at a fivestar hotel, etc etc. And was it worth it? Sure, if you judge the entire exercise by the pictures of the star accompanied by the said designer of the moment in the city supplements. Not if you look closely. Hardly a mention of the clothes or the actual fashion.So why does practically every designer (with the exception of a handful) hanker after a Bollywood showstopper? The answer may lie in the fact that in a country so diverse and versatile, the one common denominator between socioeconomic classes and geographical differences is its cinema-where its movie stars make these made-in-Mumbai films come alive, and lend mass appeal. Thus a star at a fashion show is an easy crutch to draw attention.We now have multiple fashion weeks. In fact so many such exercises are being mounted, that the inevitable ‘fatigue factor’ has reared its ugly head, and both the audience and the press are reluctant to pay too much attention to these shows. Compounding the problem is the fact that each week is packed to the gills with quantity rather than quality. So whether you are a young designer starting out, or an old one fading fast, the only way to bring in the crowds and get the chatterati talking is the presence of a movie star.Yet the exercise is quickly losing momentum. Often, movie stars looking to promote their upcoming releases will walk the ramp at fashion shows and then go on to talk about their latest film instead of the outfits they just wore. And jaded by the phenomenon, newspapers have started to simply ignore the final walk on the ramp, and publish interviews with these stars (who have been made available at the designer’s expense), where they talk about everything under the sun, except the show.But sometimes the association can be beneficial. If the designer works with a star and the star is a client or an admirer, then the connect is relevant and real. Sabyasachi, the talented man from Kolkata, has designed for long for actress Rani Mukerjee, and she has been a faithful presence at his shows. So is the case with Tarun Tahiliani and Shilpa Shetty, who walked for the designer and has sported his ensembles at her wedding and other red-carpet occasions. Plus there is Abu Jani-Sandeep Khosla who have always been the designers of choice for the Bachchan family and Dimple Kapadia among others, with these stars enthusiastically being part of every show the designer duo mount.Part of the problem has been exacerbated by fashion magazines, who in their quest for larger sales, dumped models from their covers in favour of movie celebrities. So if the press subscribed to the practice, the fashion fraternity was only too happy to follow.In the late ’90s, a watch company was launched in India. The name of the brand was a difficult one for the Indian tongue to pronounce. And thus sales suffered in spite of an aggressive advertising and PR campaign. The solution: a male star with a pan-Indian reach was called in and made its brand ambassador. An active event calendar and a big advertising campaign followed. In two years, it was among the top watch brands in the country with the star endorsing the timepieces in his shoots and films.The lesson here is that the partnership between brand and star was established as a long-standing one, and over time consumers recognised the fact. Compare this with a star’s solitary ramp walk at a fashion show that instantly fades from public memory, and doesn’t garner lasting benefits.The question to ask is, what makes customers flock towards fashion labels? Is it the multiple pictures of a movie star wearing a brand, or is it the actual fashion garments themselves?Packing a front row with B-list movie stars (as demonstrated by a designer known for his pushy manners) only takes away from whatever little design he is displaying on the ramp. Compare this to a Manish Arora and Rajesh Pratap Singh who have, to my memory, never used a movie star on the catwalk, and yet have been lauded show after show for the finesse and beauty of their presentations. Both designers, by remaining true to their essence, have garnered international acclaim and commercial success.Around the globe, we see that fashion brands engage with movie talent in a more multi-layered manner. If the star is sitting on the front row at their shows, more likely than not, he or she also features in their advertising spreads. In India, the cost of using a star in a fashion campaign is prohibitive, making this an impossibility. None of the Indian fashion houses are large enough to afford this kind of a relationship with a leading Bollywood figure.And so we will continue to see stars sparkle on the ramp in the foreseeable future. And until the show sponsors, the page-three press and the designers themselves are happy with this little stunt and what it brings to the table, fashion will remain incidental, and never the focus.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more