Turkey confirms its first human cases of avian flu

first_imgJan 4, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Turkey today confirmed two human cases of avian influenza, contradicting earlier statements and marking the disease’s first attack on people outside East Asia, according to news reports this afternoon.A 14-year-old boy who died Jan 1 and a sister who is hospitalized in serious condition both tested positive for avian flu, according to news reports quoting Turkish Health Minister Recep Akdag. He said a third sibling also has a suspected case.Two days ago Turkish officials said the two young people and two other siblings had tested negative for avian flu. The children had helped raise poultry on a farm in eastern Turkey and had been in contact with sick birds, the Associated Press reported.Akdag did not say if the two patients tested positive for the H5N1 virus specifically. But Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of this Web site, said he was told the virus was confirmed as H5N1.”The lab in Turkey that ran the most recent tests is a very competent lab that’s been collaborating with WHO [the World Health Organization] in the past, and there’s no reason to doubt these results,” Osterholm told CIDRAP News.The WHO’s human avian flu case count, which at this writing did not show the Turkish cases, lists 142 cases with 74 deaths. They include cases in Vietnam, Thailand, China, Indonesia, and Cambodia.An Agence France-Presse (AFP) report today said nine people have been hospitalized with a fever and cough in the city of Van, where the 14-year-old died.The confirmed case-patients came from the town of Dobubeyazit, about 40 miles from Aralik, where Turkish authorities last week reported an H5 virus in chickens, the AP report said. Turkey’s first H5N1 outbreak in poultry was reported Oct 5 on a farm in Kiziksa, in the northeast, according to AFP.Commenting on the cases, Osterholm said, “This should not be considered unexpected. There were sick birds, and the family had contact with them.””This does not mean we’re closer to a pandemic; it means that the situation in Southeast Asia is moving,” he said. Bird populations and the “density” of the H5N1 virus in birds remain much greater in East Asia than elsewhere, and the risk of an emerging pandemic strain is still greatest there, he added.However, he said, “The fact that there’s more virus circulating in more birds around the world means there’s a greater likelihood of mutational change” that could lead to a pandemic strain.last_img read more

How to Tell if Someone Is Having a Heart Attack

first_img Share 44 Views   no discussions Although you’re probably familiar with the classic heart attack scenario from movies and TV, most people don’t just clutch their chests and fall to the ground.Heart attacks usually start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort, or even more subtle flu-like symptoms. Heart attack symptoms can be subtle, and it’s not always easy to tell what’s happening.But if someone is having a heart attack, every second counts: There’s a limited window of time before heart muscle is permanently damaged. Delaying treatment also increases the risk of sudden death from an irregular heart rhythm.To give someone the best possible chance of recovery, it’s wise to familiarize yourself with the warning signs of a heart attack.Remember that all heart attacks are not equal: Even if you’ve seen someone have a heart attack before, a second heart attack or a heart attack in someone else might not have the same symptoms.Pay special attention to heart attack symptoms in women Although many people mistakenly believe that cardiovascular disease isn’t a problem for women, it’s still a leading cause of death. Unfortunately, women tend to have different heart attack symptoms than men, so heart disease may go unrecognized until it’s too late.In a study of 515 women who’d had heart attacks, the most frequently reported symptoms were unusual fatigue, sleep disturbances, shortness of breath, indigestion, and anxiety. Less than one-third reported any chest discomfort.How to respond if you see signs of a heart attack In general, it’s best to call 911 if you have any reason to suspect that someone is having a heart attack. Waiting even an hour or two may limit treatment options and reduce the chance of a full recovery. It’s common for someone having a heart attack to downplay the situation because he or she isembarrassed and doesn’t want to cause a scene.Take charge and call for help even if the person tries to talk you out of it. Don’t wait to see if heart attack symptoms go away — and call even if the symptoms do disappear or come and go. If it turns out to be something less serious than a heart attack, at least you’ll have some peace of mind.Bear in mind that not all of the following warning signs occur in every heart attack.The five signs of heart attack:Chest discomfort or painThe most commonly reported heart attack symptom among men is chest discomfort, often described as a heaviness, tightness, or even a burning sensation. The feeling usually starts in the center of the chest and may or may not radiate to other areas of the body. It may go away and then come back, or it may be continuous. If you’re aware of someone experiencing any persistent chest discomfort, call 911 right away. Even if it’s angina rather than a full-blown heart attack, he needs to see a doctor. Share Tweet Sharelast_img read more