Tata Group eyes Myanmar Vietnam as future markets

first_imgSeven companies of the Tata Group would focus on Myanmar and Vietnam as viable markets to expand its business. Growing economies, expanding middle class and tax incentives have made these two countries as important destinations for firms looking to expand their global operations in the South East Asia region.Tata companies such as Tata Power, Tata Projects, Tata Chemical, Titan and Tata Motors, among others, are on the lookout for opportunities in Vietnam and Myanmar. For the giant business group, Singapore is the related country for Asean markets, which includes a $2 trillion economy, The Economic Times reported on Feb. 9.Asean countries include Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia.”The demographics and the economic development stage of these countries represent a market for several products and services from the Tata Group,” a Tata Sons spokesperson told the publication.India’s oldest business conglomerate has an understanding each in Vietnam and Myanmar for power projects. It is now planning to strengthen its engagement with a strategic point of view.”The region has recorded more than 5% GDP growth on average since the year 2000 and, when combined, Asean nations would represent the world’s seventh-largest economy. The region, is therefore, regarded by many as the third pillar of economic growth within Asia, after China and India,” Shashank Tripathi, partner and strategy leader at PwC was quoted as saying by the publication.Vietnam reportedly signed a free trade agreement with the European Union on Dec. 2, 2015. The country, which is set to become global trade partner for the US, the EU and China in exports, makes it important strategic partner for India.A joint statement by India and Myanmar on the first meeting of the India-Myanmar Joint consultative commission held in July 2015 stated that both sides of the concerned ministries would work towards expeditious signing of the MoU on capacity building between the RBI of India and the Central Bank of Myanmar. The MoU took note of the proposal the Indian government had put forward of granting license to an Indian Bank to open its branch in Myanmar.last_img read more

Sore losers TMC damaged tubewells water lines after Lok Sabha results in

first_imgDIBYANGSHU SARKAR/AFP/Getty ImagesThe Bharatiya Janata Party has accused the Trinamool Congress of acting like sore losers after the disastrous Lok Sabha election results for Mamata Banerjee in West Bengal. It is being claimed that Trinamool Congress cadres damaged public property “to teach a lesson to the locals” for supporting the saffron party. The BJP has registered a landslide victory in West Bengal and increased its seat count from two in the 2014 Lok Sabha elections to 18 this year.According to IANS, the Trinamool Congress cadres damaged tubewells and snapped water lines in three localities of West Burdwan and Birbhum districts. It was done as BJP received more votes in the Kanakpur polling booth of Birbhum Lok Sabha constituency.”All tubewells in the village have been damaged, because BJP has done well,” said local BJP worker Laltu Mondal.In protest, the villagers gheraoed the house of local panchayat member of Trinamool Congress, Panchanan Das. He denied his party’s hand in damaging the tubewells but promised to repair them.”Nobody can say that Trinamool, or a panchayat member, or some other local club has done all this. BJP has won. It is trying to put the blame on us,” he said. The tubewells were later repaired.last_img read more

Honduras declares state of emergency

first_imgSupporters of Honduran presidential candidate for the Opposition Alliance against the Dictatorship coalition Salvador Nasralla, clash with security forces during protests demanding the final results of the weekend’s presidential election, in Tegucigalpa on Friday. Photo: AFPThe Honduran government declared a state of emergency late Friday and imposed a 10-day curfew in an attempt to stop violent demonstrations across the country triggered by claims of presidential election fraud.Police said at least two officers and 12 civilians were injured, some by gunfire, after clashes in several parts of the country between riot police and opposition supporters.The violence was sparked by opposition candidate Salvador Nasralla claiming election fraud and calling his supporters onto the streets.An executive decree issued by President Juan Orlando Hernandez, who is seeking re-election despite a constitutional ban on a second term, imposes a nighttime curfew from 6:00 pm to 6:00 am.Representatives of the country’s Supreme Electoral Tribunal (TSE) and political parties, national and international observers and journalists accredited to cover the elections are exempt.Thousands of Nasralla supporters blocked roads across the country, and footage of their confrontations with the police-who attempted to disperse demonstrators with tear gas-went viral on social media.In the capital Tegucigalpa, protesters lit bonfires of sticks and tires on boulevards and on exit routes.The unrest sparked panic, with people rushing to supermarkets and gas stations to stock up, fearing the riots would prevent them from leaving their homes.Shops closed by the afternoon and some international flights were suspended at the capital’s airport.Cliffhanger voteWith nearly 95 percent of the ballots counted from last week’s vote, Hernandez had a razor-thin lead of 42.92 percent over Nasralla’s 41.42 percent.TSE president David Matamoros postponed until Saturday a special count-with officials from both camps present-to review ballots with inconsistencies, blurs and other errors before a result can be declared, following new demands from leftist leader and ex-president Manuel Zelaya.“Within three days, we will have the result. We accept to recognise the final result if they accept these points,” Zelaya said.But in an television interview, Nasralla demanded a full recount, warning of possible collusion between the TSE and the government.“Do not let them steal the presidency,” said activist Juan Barahona of Nasralla’s Alliance of Opposition Against the Dictatorship.Police said they had arrested 50 people for alleged looting between Thursday and Friday.Security forces said rioters had damaged businesses and vehicles, some of which had been doused in gasoline and set on fire.Earlier, Hernandez broadcast a statement calling for calm and predicting “we are going to do very well” in the vote.The Organization of American States observer mission urged the TSE in a letter Thursday to ensure that 100 percent of the ballots were processed before declaring a result.“Political parties should be given the opportunity to present challenges. These will have to be dealt with impartially and within a reasonable timeframe and following due process,” it said.“This is the only way to restore confidence in this election and in the integrity of the popular will.”last_img read more

Male baboons found to engage in feticide

first_img Infanticide has been documented in a variety of species, including lions, rodents, whales, and many types of primates, including humans. The general consensus in the scientific community is that the behavior occurs because it makes the mother more available to the male that does the killing. Less common is feticide, where a male causes harm to a pregnant female that results in the death of the fetus. In this new effort, the researchers report on the first-ever evidence of feticide in baboons.Prior research has shown that baboons engage in infanticide, but until now, it was not known that sometimes males also engage in feticide. In studying baboons in the Amboseli basin in Kenya the researchers report that they observed a number of feticide episodes by males that were new to a group. They note also that such attacks often left the mother dead as well, thus defeating the purpose of the attack. They report that causing a mother to abort a fetus reduced both pregnancy and lactation times, making the females more readily available for mating if they managed to survive the attack. They noted also that in cases when the female did survive, it was often the case that she would mate with her attacker.The researchers report that such attacks happened more often during periods of scarce resources; when new males managed to achieve high status quickly; when there were a lot of infants in a group; or if the males remained with a new group for more than three months. The team notes that it was obviously much more difficult to spot feticide than infanticide—they had to change their study habits to follow females after intercourse for a period of time to note changes in physiology or behavior that likely signaled a pregnancy and then to watch for episodes of violence against them and what followed afterwards. © 2017 Phys.org (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S., some with ties to the Institute of Primate Research, National Museums of Kenya, has found that male baboons in the wild at times engage in feticide. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the researchers describe their observations and offer some theories on why they believe it occurs. Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Some baboon males are prone to commit domestic violence when forced to move into a group with few fertile females, researchers find. Credit: Photo by Catherine Markham, Stony Brook Universitycenter_img Citation: Male baboons found to engage in feticide (2017, January 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-01-male-baboons-engage-feticide.html Explore further Male Manogea porracea spiders found to care for young More information: Matthew N. Zipple et al. Conditional fetal and infant killing by male baboons, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2016.2561AbstractSexually selected feticide—the death of infants in utero as a result of male behaviour—has only rarely been described or analysed, although it is presumed to be favoured by the same selective pressures that favour sexually selected infanticide. To test this hypothesis, we measured the frequency of feticide and infanticide by male baboons of the Amboseli basin in Kenya, and examined which characteristics of a male and his environment made him more likely to commit feticide and/or infanticide. We found a dramatic increase in fetal and infant death rates, but no increase in death rates of 1- to 2-year-old individuals, following the immigration of males who stood to benefit from feticide and infanticide. Specifically, fetal and infant death rates were highest following immigrations in which: (i) the immigrant male rapidly attained high rank, (ii) that male remained consistently resident in the group for at least three months, (iii) food availability and social group range overlap was relatively low and (iv) relatively many pregnant females and/or dependent infants were present. Together, these results provide strong evidence for the existence of both sexually selected feticide and infanticide in our population, and they indicate that feticide and infanticide are conditional male behavioural strategies employed under particular circumstances.Press releaselast_img read more