Flag retirement program begins across San Diego County

first_img KUSI Newsroom July 5, 2019 Flag retirement program begins across San Diego County SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The county and city of San Diego will begin a program Friday enabling residents to dispose of old U.S. flags in accordance with federal code.County Supervisor Greg Cox announced the County Flag Retirement Box program last month in honor of Flag Day and in advance of the Fourth of July, saying it will help residents “dispose of old or tattered flags with the proper respect they deserve.”Starting Friday, residents will be able to drop off their old flags in designated boxes at county libraries, as well as the city of San Diego’s public libraries. Local Boy Scout troops will frequently collect the boxes and deliver them to local American Legion posts and associated nonprofits that will conduct flag retirement ceremonies.“County Supervisor Greg Cox’s Flag Retirement Box program will give San Diegans the opportunity to retire their American flags with the dignity and respect they deserve,” City Councilman Chris Cate said. “The American flag is a symbol of our freedom, and it is wonderful that all city of San Diego libraries will be participating in this program.”The program is similar to one promoted by the National Association of Counties, of which Cox is president. According to the NACo, the program has distributed roughly 700 flag boxes to more than 500 counties around the country to ensure proper flag disposal. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: July 5, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

Govts drive against black money brings Rs 3770 crore to its kitty

first_imgThe Indian government’s drive against black money to get back ill-gotten wealth stashed away by its citizens abroad has drawn responses from 638 declarants for total assets worth Rs 3,770 crore ($580 million), an official statement said on Thursday.The amnesty scheme ended on September 30. It called for a tax of 30% and an equal amount in penalty, which is to be paid before December 31. The compliance window had opened on July 1.The official statement said the actual quantum of declaration, under what is called the Black Money (Undisclosed Foreign Income and Assets) and Imposition of Tax Act, 2015, was subject to a final reconcilitaion.India has no official estimate about the quantum of black money stashed away by Indians abroad but unofficial estimates put the sum somewhere between $466 billion and $1.4 trillion.Even if the lowest estimate of $466 billion stashed away is taken into consideration, the amount declared as part of the drive is barely 1% of it.- With IANS inputslast_img read more

UK India can do great business and achieve real change British envoy

first_imgTech Rocketship Award winners posing with British Deputy High Commissioner Dominic McAllister and Gita Krisnankutty – first secretary of head of inward investment India.IBTimes India/Sami KhanThere are now a record 842 Indian companies operating in the UK, up from 800 in the previous year, with combined revenues of almost £48 billion (£46.4 billion in 2018 report), according to a Grant Thornton-CII report. Indian companies paid a combined total of over £684 million in corporation tax, which is almost double the amount recorded in last year’s report (£360 million), and employed 104,783 people (104,932 in the 2018 report). The India Meets Britain Tracker 2019 report was released earlier this year. GT and CII are holding a roadshow in Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Mumbai and New Delhi to highlight the report’s findings.During the report’s launch at the roadshow in Bengaluru on Tuesday, British Deputy High Commissioner in Bengaluru, Dominic McAllister, said: “We are determined that the UK will be the best place in the world to grow your business. The UK government is committed to facilitating the closest possible relationships between business leaders in both our countries – including supporting pioneers in innovation. The UK and India can do great business and achieve real change. Both governments are committed to taking this further by building on the technology partnership; leveraging finance; sharing skills and expertise.”The report provides a tracker of the fastest-growing companies, as measured by those with a turnover of more than £5 million, year-on-year revenue growth of at least 10 percent and a minimum two-year track-record in the UK. This year’s tracker includes 62 companies that recorded an average growth rate of 37 percent. The total combined revenue of these companies reached over £12 billion last year. Three companies in this year’s tracker reported a growth of more than 100 percent. UNCTAD/twitterThe UK and India have been the top five investors in each other’s economies since 2010. Since 2010, the UK has been the largest G20 investor in India. Building on the UK’s Industrial Strategy, the India-UK Tech Partnership sets out how we are building a Britain fit for the future – how we will help businesses create better, higher-paying jobs with investment in the skills, industries, and infrastructure that we will need, added McAllister.Technology and telecoms companies continue to dominate the Tracker, as they have done since its launch in 2014. This year, they account for 35 percent of the fastest-growing companies. Engineering and manufacturing companies are the next in line, accounting for 16 percent of the 2019 Tracker. This is followed by pharmaceutical and chemical companies, which account for 15 percent, continuing historically strong representation.The geographical spread of the fastest-growing Indian companies across the UK remains unchanged compared to last year. London continues to be the preferred location for more than half (53 percent) of the 62 fastest growing Indian companies. London is the global home of capital. Over £2.2 billion (Rs 20,000 crore) in Masala Bonds have been listed on the London Stock Exchange by Indian companies.last_img read more

Learning About Diversity And Deescalation Tactics Is Part of Police Training In

first_imgListen Al OrtizImmigration lawyer Silvia Mintz (right) gave a lecture to cadets from the Houston Police Department when they visited the Denver Harbor Multi-Service Center, which is located in a part of Houston where many residents are immigrants from Latin American countries, as part of HPD’s diversity tour initiative.The quality of the training of police officers in Texas has been in the spotlight recently and incidents such as the arrest of Sandra Bland in Waller County last year and the shooting of Alva Braziel in Houston this past summer have raised questions about how law enforcement deals with diversity and de-escalation tactics.One of the measures the Houston Police Department has taken recently is a tour of the city to teach cadets about its diversity.The tour makes stops in African-American, Asian, Latino and Muslim neighborhoods.“We recruit nationwide and, so, many cadets don’t really understand the history of Houston and, so, we’ll take them out to Acres Homes, we’ll take them out to Meyerland, we’ll take them out to the Fifth Ward and community members will engage them and speak with them and then they’ll take the bus tour and kind of get a cultural history of Houston,” explains Assistant Chief Charlie Vazquez, who oversees the Professional Development Command at HPD.Vazquez says learning about Houston’s diversity is useful for the cadets because they are introduced to members of the community who can help them establish trust in the groups they will be working with and that is a trust that eventually should lead to more effective policing.Cadet Egla Flores says the tour allows trainees to learn small details that will help them when they interact with the public.She gives an example of something she learned at the Islamic Society of Greater Houston when she took the tour.“If we try to shake the woman’s hand they probably wouldn’t shake our hand, they would place their hands over their chest. It’s just little things that we learn from different communities,” Flores notes.But Houston is not the only city where police officers learn about diversity.The Texas Commission on Law Enforcement requires that diversity and multiculturalism are part of the curriculum used for the basic training all police officers go through in the state.The courses are a reflection of the changing demographics in the United States because of the growth of minorities and they also teach why police officers must avoid racial profiling.There is also a class on basic Spanish due to the large Latino population of Texas.“My sense is that minimal requirements for understanding diverse peoples are probably being met adequately across the board,” comments Phillip Lyons, dean at the Criminal Justice College of Sam Houston State University.Lyons also thinks initiatives like HPD’s diversity course represent an added value for the training of its future officers.In addition to diversity, the concept of de-escalation has also become an increasingly important component of the training through the years.“I think the actions of the police have come under heightened scrutiny as it relates to how we deal with folks who have mental health problems or who are in crisis and, as a result of that, there is more attention given to training,” Lyons adds.Some of the tools police officers are instructed to use to de-escalate tense situations are prioritizing self-control and not behaving in an aggressive or condescending way, but paying attention to the nuances of non-verbal communication for certain communities can also be important.For example, officers are taught that some Latinos may prefer not to make eye contact not because they are lying, but because it is the way they show respect.Knowing how to work around personal space is relevant as well.Officer C.K. Traxler, who works for the Pasadena Police Department and teaches crisis intervention, explains that they teach cadets and police officers who go through training “to look for signs of stress in the person as you are approaching and if you see their stress level going up, you stop at that point or maybe even back up a little bit to reduce the stress that they’re already feeling.”Police officers frequently conduct traffic stops, which can present situations that turn confrontational and those are situations in which the training is useful.The protocol for police officers is that they must always say what is the reason for the stop and allow the driver to give an explanation for the traffic violation the officer deems he or she has committed, which can lower the stress of the situation. 00:00 /04:07 X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Sharelast_img read more