Price: BT not yet out of the woods

first_img “With seven games to go, I told the players that we needed to win all games to stay up. We had a blip in the loss against Waterhouse. Now, we have to gain at least a point in the last game to be safe,” he explained. Price praised his senior players for their roles in the team’s revival. “The leadership of senior players – Michael Campbell, Daemion Benjamin, Wayne Ellis, Garfield Gillespie, Rafiek Thomas, Xavian Virgo, as well as young Shamar Nicholson who has netted 14 goals, has been very good,” the former Boys’ Town defender pointed out. With Arnett already safe and still in contention for the title, Price is not taking comfort from that. “We are going to Arnett to win the game on merit, show integrity. It is a Trench Town derby. It is a big game,” Price noted. Andrew Price, the coach of relegation threatened Boys’ Town, said that despite his team’s good recent form, they need at least a point against neighbouring Arnett Gardens in the Trench Town derby tomorrow at the Anthony Spaulding Sports Complex.. Having spent four months in last place in the Red Stripe Premier League, Boys’ Town are enjoying their best form of the season with five wins in their last six league games. That impressive form moved the Collie Smith Drive-based team into ninth position on 35 points ahead of Waterhouse (34), Maverley-Hughenden (32) and already relegated Jamalco who are at the bottom on 30 points. However, after being written off as likely candidates for relegation, Boys’ Town just need to avoid defeat in their last fixture in order to be safe for the nation’s elite league next season. “We are not out of the woods yet,” Price who has been coaching Boys’ Town for over ten years told The Gleaner. NEEDED TO WINlast_img read more

Settle The Beef Mark Sanchez Says Hell Start Over

New York Jets quarterback Geno Smith skipped out on Mark Sanchez’s annual “Jets West” camp, but Sanchez told the press that he will be the starting quarterback when the season begins, so ultimately it did not matter that Smith didn’t show.“I don’t hold it against any of the guys who can’t make it,” Sanchez said Friday after a two-hour practice. “There are no hard feelings about anything like [that]. Greg [McElroy] isn’t here, [Matt] Simms isn’t here, some guys are gone getting married. They’re doing stuff. There are plenty of other things they could be doing. If they could make the sacrifice and be here, awesome. If they can’t, that’s totally fine. I would never hold a grudge against anybody that’s not here.”When Sanchez was asked if he would be the starter in the beginning of training camp, he said, “Absolutely.” read more

STUDENT HOSPITALIZED PRINCIPAL CALLS OFF BUS SERVICE

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 5 Nov 2014 – Clement Howell High principal, Kadean Cunningham has cancelled bus service to students this afternoon in the aftermath of an accident which has left a student hospitalized.Apparently a school bus ran over the child’s foot.MAgnetic Media has no further details at this time, but Mrs Cunningham did reach out to say the Bus Service for hundreds of students would be suspended. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Clement Howell High get their hands dirty for World Wetlands Day 2016 Related Items:Bus accident, clement howell high school, Hospitalize, Kadean cunningham Recommended for you Eagles win again at InterHigh Championships National Heritage Month endslast_img read more

Amid Fitness Boom the New Editor of Womens Running Sees Opportunity

first_img Warren: The popularity of running is really taking off with women in particular. Women now account for the majority of entrants in competitive races, clocking in at 57 percent, according to RunningUSA. That’s millions of women, and I want to reach all of them! Warren: I would love to start a podcast and explore the possibility of live events. I think the best way for a brand to grow and evolve is to foster an ongoing conversation with its audience. Building a strong and engaged community of readers helps to drive the brand forward and inform its content choices, and this is a core focus for me in the next year. Warren: Our biggest challenge is the same one that every media company faces: finding the best way to connect with our audience. The constantly evolving digital landscape means publishers have to remain vigilant about new technologies and agile about responding to how consumers want to receive content. Warren: Jessie has built a phenomenal brand, and I want to carry on the work that she has done by increasing brand awareness for readers as well as for advertisers and content partners. My experience customizing and localizing content across multiple platforms for various publishing and brand partnerships and my role as a brand spokesperson will be beneficial in achieving these goals. Last month, Competitor Group tapped Lonely Planet managing editor Rebecca Warren to do just that. Folio: sat down with Warren to learn a little more about her background and plans for the title going forward. With America in the midst of a “running boom” — 17 million people ran a race in the U.S. last year, 57 percent of them females — suffice it to say that her successor has some big sneakers to fill. Folio: What do you see as some of your biggest growth opportunities for the brand? ​Over her seven-year tenure as editor-in-chief of Women’s Running — prior to being promoted, earlier this year, to VP of Media for parent company Competitor Group Inc. — Jessica Sebor garnered deserved applause for repositioning the monthly title as not just a fitness magazine, but an advocate for inclusion, empowerment, and positivity. Covers that once almost exclusively featured models jogging in sports bras and taglines teasing 24-hour diets and shortcuts to flat abs have given way to women of all body types, who encourage readers with messages like “Love yourself,” “Dream big,” and “Feel great.” In the past year alone, Women’s Running cover stars have included a wheelchair track and field star, a transgender woman, and a runner wearing a hijab.  Folio: What about some challenges? Sebor’s impact has been felt on the business side too, where digital traffic has more then doubled in the last two years to over one million monthly visitors, while print circulation holds steady at around 45,000 copies per issue. Warren: Yes, we have a strong base of readers who subscribe to the print magazine and that remains a priority for me. Industry-wide, the dwell time with a print article is much greater than with a digital one, and it also offers a chance to have a focused, tactile interaction with the reader. The value of being able to engage with an article without a text message or alert popping up during your reading time can’t be overstated. Increasing our presence at races, through partnerships and brand ambassadors, is one way to do that. I also want to hone our social media strategy to give people a consistent and focused brand message across all of our content channels. We have a website redesign in the works as well, and my focus will be bringing a cohesive look and message across all of our content hubs. I’d also like to explore the possibility of retail partnerships and direct-to-consumer services. The fact that running is a low-barrier, widely accessible sport was also appealing. There is a broad audience available for women-specific running content, and that is an exciting opportunity. Rebecca Warren: I love what the brand stands for: inspiring and empowering women to live healthy, fulfilled lives. Women’s Running offers readers a holistic approach to wellness, focusing on running as a gateway to healthy living, by promoting positive body images, balanced nutrition, and practical and achievable fitness goals. Folio: Obviously the brand is seeing a lot of growth on the digital and social media side. Do you expect the print magazine to remain a priority going forward? Folio: Any other opportunities for expanding the WR brand? Rebecca Warren Folio: What first attracted you to the editor-in-chief role at Women’s Running? Folio: What do you bring to the position that will help you pick up where Jessie [Sebor] left off? last_img read more

A family that cooks together stays together Is The Mantra That Pushed

first_img“A family that ‘cooks’ together, stays together” is the mantra that pushed Chef Shagun Mehra to pursue a career in food. India Food Network spoke to the talented chef and wine connoisseur about her food philosophy, inspiration and how travel has changed her perspective towards food in this interview.Do you have any fond food memory from your childhood?I remember in the summer we used to churn our own fresh Alphonso ice-cream. Each member in the family would take turns in churning the ice-cream. This was the traditional way of churning cream and mangoes into ice-cream. I am salivating at the thought of it!When was the first time you realized you want to pursue a career in food?When I was about 15, the chef at our family hotel had just completed his culinary training in Italy. Once back, he started teaching me some of the most traditional Italian recipes. This got me very excited and I wanted to study culinary arts and explore the world of gastronomy.How did the culinary school help you hone your skills as a chef?It gave me the technical know-how and insight on various cooking methods. It formed the base for me to understand different types of chopping techniques and also creating complex dishes. This enabled me to explore the culinary world and build on it using the academic and technical base that the school offered me.What is your food philosophy?I believe in the richness of local produce and traditional recipes and cooking techniques. I think India is a diverse and expansive nation and there is so much to discover in each state and within each state, there are nuances of different cuisine styles.IBT does not endorse any of the above content.last_img read more

Officer Charged in Death Man Definitely Intended to Shoot

first_imgBy JONATHAN MATTISE, Associated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A White Nashville police officer told investigators that he knew “100 percent” that the Black man he’s charged with fatally shooting intended to shoot at him and possibly others.Prosecutors played the state investigator’s interview with Andrew Delke, 25, in a Nashville courtroom Friday, where dozens of police officers packed in to support Delke. The officers sat across from rows of family members and others there to advocate for Daniel Hambrick, the 25-year-old who died in the shooting as he ran from Delke and held a pistol.Vickie Hambrick, center, mother of Daniel Hambrick, listens during a preliminary hearing for Nashville Police officer Andrew Delke at the Justice A.A. Birch Building Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Delke is charged with criminal homicide for the on-duty shooting of Daniel Hambrick. (George Walker IV/The Tennessean via AP)The shooting death has reignited questions about policing of Nashville’s Black community. The outcry stirred enough support to place a question on the city’s November ballot about creating a citizen oversight board for the police force, and voters approved the measure widely.A judge is considering whether there is probable cause to pass the case on to a grand jury, an early but critical step in the process. Friday’s five-hour hearing on the matter will spill over into Saturday and the judge is expected to make a decision Monday.In his interview, Delke said he relied on his training when Hambrick didn’t heed his instructions to drop the gun, including warning that Delke would otherwise shoot, and the weapon at some point faced the officer.“I said to myself, ‘If I don’t shoot him right now, I’m gonna die,’” Delke said.Assistant district attorney Ronald Dowdy focused on the lack of video footage or witness testimony about Hambrick turning, looking back or aiming his weapon at Delke, as Delke claimed in his interview.During testimony, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation special agent Steven Kennard estimated that Hambrick would have been in a blind spot for about two seconds between cameras that caught the foot chase. Kennard said it would have been “very difficult” to stop, slow down, spin around and face Delke, and then be sprinting again in that timeframe.Questioning by defense attorneys sought to paint scenarios where Hambrick could have had time or a sightline to look back at Delke during that window. They also said that state law allows deadly force by police when they have probable cause that a suspect poses the threat of serious bodily injury to the officer or others.“An officer is not under any obligation to let an armed suspect have the first shot,” defense attorney John Brown said in a line of questioning.According to the arrest affidavit in September, Delke pulled into an apartment parking lot and mistook a different car for one he had been following while looking for stolen vehicles and known juvenile offenders, though he found the car wasn’t stolen. Several people were in the area as Delke stopped nearby, one of them Hambrick, who began to run, the affidavit says.Delke chased Hambrick and yelled at him to stop, though the officer didn’t know the fleeing man’s identity, the affidavit says. Delke believed Hambrick may have been connected to the car Delke misidentified, but didn’t know for sure, the affidavit says.The affidavit says Delke shot Hambrick in the back, torso and the back of his head. A fourth shot missed him.Hambrick’s mother started crying and briefly left the courtroom after prosecutors played surveillance footage of the shooting.last_img read more

Beware Babys cry can alter your brain functions

first_imgThe brain data revealed that the infant cries reduce attention to the task and triggered greater cognitive conflict processing than infant laughs. “Parental instinct appears to be hardwired yet no one talks about how this instinct might include cognition,” said David Haley from the University of Toronto.The team looked at infant vocalisations — in this case, audio clips of a baby laughing or crying —and its effect on adults who completed a cognitive conflict task.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’They asked participants to rapidly identify the colour of a printed word while ignoring the meaning of the word itself. Brain activity was measured using electroencephalography (EEG), which took place immediately after a two-second audio clip of an infant vocalisation. Cognitive conflict processing is important because it controls attention — one of the most basic executive functions needed to complete a task or make a decision. A baby’s cry has been shown to cause aversion in adults but it could also be creating an adaptive response, “switching on” the cognitive control parents use in effectively responding to their child’s emotional needs while also addressing other demands in everyday life, Haley added in a paper published in the journal PLOS ONE.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix“If an infant’s cry activates cognitive conflict in the brain, it could also be teaching parents how to focus their attention more selectively,” he added. The findings add to a growing body of research suggesting that infants occupy a privileged status in our neurobiological programming, one deeply rooted in our evolutionary past. But, as Haley noted, it also reveals an important adaptive cognitive function in the human brain.last_img read more

Revisiting Childhood

first_imgChief Guest NK Sinha, Secretary, Ministry of Culture, Govt of India inaugurated the theatre festival in presence of eminent theatre and film actors Manoj Joshi and Mukesh Tiwari, Prof Waman Kendre, Director of NSD, Arjun Deo Charan, Vice Chairman, NSD Society and Prof Abdul Latif Khatana, Chief, Theatre-in-Education, NSD.Five professional groups from Rajasthan, Punjab, Gujarat and Delhi and schools from Delhi-NCR, came together to present ‘Bal-Vrind’ – a musical dance performance, under the direction of Dr Laique Hussain to kick-start the gala event. The festival is a reputed theatre experience focusing the children, representing various regions and languages from across the country and beyond.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfNK Sinha, Secretary, Ministry of Culture, Govt of India said, “I wish Jashne Bachpan keeps growing every year so that more kids can be a part of it. I would like to thank all the children for making this festival more joyous and successful.”This year’s Jashne Bachpan theatre festival will showcase work of some of most eminent as well as emerging theatre directors and established theatre groups enacting plays (with and for children) with full-fledged productions and will be on till November 25, 2016. Rechristened as Jashne Bachpan-International Children Theatre Festival, for the first time the festival will have international participation and will feature 27 productions, including seven productions from foreign countries like Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Turkey, Israel, France and Switzerland. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveManoj Joshi, eminent film & theatre personality said, “In every school theatre should be taught because kids who are into theatre are confident enough to get into anything and not just only theatre. Through Jashne Bachpan all the theatre experts of the country should be connected and theatre should be made compulsory in education.”As with the previous editions, the National School of Drama campus will be converted into a veritable kids mela for this 12 day theatre carnival, as thousands of kids are expected to be a part of the festival. The festival was started in 1998 by Sanskar Rang Toli (T.I.E Co.), NSD in order to contribute to the growth and development of children’s theatre across the country, and has now come to be regarded as one of the largest and most important theatre festivals in India for Children.last_img read more