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first_img News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more The study compared diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) scans of extremely low birth weight infants to those of healthy, full-term newborns. DTT is a MRI technique that produces 3-D images and is able to detect the brain’s structure and subtle injuries. News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more “This protocol opens the field to far greater use of the methodology for targeting and assessing therapies in these infants,” said Dr. Parikh, who also is an associate professor of pediatrics at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. “We already have studies underway using our DTT segmentation methodology to measure the effectiveness of early neuroprotective interventions, such as the use of breast milk or skin-to-skin contact while premature babies are in intensive care.” News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more The research team confirmed differences in the fibrous structure of the 10 tracts between healthy, full-term infant brains and those of premature babies.  For more information: www.plosone.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more As imaging technology continues to be refined, targeted therapies based on specific regions of the brain with a delay or injury may become reality, Dr. Parikh predicted.  News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Image courtesy of Imago Systemscenter_img “Developing a reliable and reproducible methodology for studying the premature brain was crucial in order for us to get to the next step: assessing neuroprotective therapies,” said Nehal A. Parikh, D.O., principal investigator, Center for Perinatal Research at Nationwide Children’s and senior author on the paper. “Now that we have this protocol, we can improve the standard of care and evaluate efforts to promote brain health within 8 to 12 weeks of beginning the interventions. That way, we can quickly see what really works.” News | January 29, 2014 Brain Imaging Could Predict Deficits in Premature Infants Researchers developed protocol for using the imaging technique to study development of 10 brain tracts, which was published in Plos One. Colorful 3-D images of each tract revealed connections of segments to different parts of the brain or the spinal cord. Each of the 10 tracts is important for certain functions and abilities, such as language, movement or vision. Related Content Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more January 29, 2014 — Physicians may be able to identify premature infants at-risk for deficits using 3-D MRI imaging techniques developed by clinician scientists at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The imaging technique could enable early neuroprotective therapies and help determine if they are effective in a matter of weeks, instead of the two to five years previously required. News | Colonoscopy Systems | August 06, 2019 Rise in Early Onset Colorectal Cancer Not Aligned With Screening Trends A new study finds that trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in… read morelast_img read more

NEW YORK NY – In the premiere episode of the ne

first_img NEW YORK, N.Y. – In the premiere episode of the new FX series “Pose,” a young black man hoping to be a star modern dancer is escorted into his first drag ball. Wild-eyed, he eagerly soaks it in. It quite literally makes him speechless.In front of him are members of his fellow LGBTQ community dressed in high-fashion finery, strutting down a runway with fierce glamour and arch confidence as their friends cheer. It is 1987 in a gritty part of New York hit hard by crack and AIDS, and yet this is an act of defiance.“We are not going to be walking the red carpet at the Oscars but this is our moment to become a star,” our aspiring dancer is told by his escort. “Balls are a gathering of people who are not welcome to gather anywhere else.”“Pose,” which airs Sundays, dreamed up by newcomer Steven Canals and ushered into production by mega-producer Ryan Murphy, acts as our escort into a world that has never been celebrated on TV before, starring the largest LGBTQ cast ever for a scripted series.“The fact that this incredible community of black and brown queer and trans people could find a way to create community and family and survive in the face of poverty and disease and violence just astounded me,” he said. “So ‘Pose’ really came out of not only wanting to write a love letter about New York but also a way to just pay homage to these incredible souls.”Canals, who was born in the South Bronx, came across the balls in his 20s and wrote the original draft of “Pose” in 2014 while working on his master’s at UCLA. When he tried to get it made, he faced plenty of resistance from TV executives.“There were execs who were just blatantly transphobic and racist, who were like, ‘The show is too queer, too trans, too black, too brown, it’s a period piece, and you don’t have a name so no one is ever going to make this.’”While some of the topics are heavy — drugs, AIDS and even anti-trans bigotry at the hands of white gay men — the creators have built the series on optimism and the universal yearning to create a family.“It needed to be aspirational and hopeful, because we’ve never seen people like this occupy space in television, ever. We didn’t want to create this bleak, baroque version of New York,” said Canals. “And yet we still wanted to be true to the time period. So we made sure that we centred and grounded the narrative in the theme of family and ambition and survival.”The response so far has been very warm. The New York Times called it a “boisterous, resplendent drama,” while NBC called it “the best network family drama of 2018.” Variety said: “There’s simply never been a show on TV quite like ‘Pose.’”The drama contains multiple overlapping stories, including the ballroom rivalry between two houses run by two very different den mothers (Mj Rodriguez and Dominique Jackson). Ryan Jamaal Swain plays the dancer who is thrown out by his parents for being gay and learns about this subculture.There is also a social-climbing businessman (Evan Peters) who falls in love with Angel (Indya Moore), a transgender prostitute. And there’s Billy Porter, winner of a Tony Award for wearing 34-inch red leather boots in “Kinky Boots,” who plays the balls’ organizer and MC.Porter, who was studying at Carnegie Mellon in 1987, said he never expected to see his own story on national television. He called it “the greatest job of his life” and hopes people will tune in to open their minds.“Americans didn’t watch ‘Will & Grace’ because it was about gay people. They watched it because it was good. They watched it because it was great,” he said. “If you get an education, so be it. If you don’t, it’s still great.”If anything, “Pose” is an education into the world and language that would go on to influence Madonna, the seminal 1990 documentary “Paris Is Burning,” and “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” (The slang “throwing shade” comes from ballroom culture.) Fans of the 1980s will also enjoy songs from the era, including Kate Bush’s “Running Up That Hill,” Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” and Chaka Khan’s “Ain’t Nobody.”Someone who appeared in an early draft of the series but who didn’t make the final cut is, of all people, Donald J. Trump. The writers had flirted with the idea of portraying the real estate mogul as a symbol of the greed-is-good Manhattan of the late 1980s. They backed down, but still show Trump Tower, where James Van Der Beek plays a coke-sniffing, amoral executive.“If we made Donald Trump a character and centred him in that way then it was just going to suck energy from what the narrative is truly about,” said Canals. “The reality is that there are still folks who are living in poverty (and) there are still folks who are dealing with the fallout of choices that he has made.”___Online:http://www.fxnetworks.com/shows/pose___Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits This image released by FX shows Indya Moore as Angel, from left, Ryan Jamaal Swain as Damon and Mj Rodriguez as Blanca in a scene from the new series “Pose,” airing Sundays on FX. (JoJo Whilden/FX via AP) Creator of ‘Pose’ says FX show celebrates ‘incredible souls’center_img by Mark Kennedy, The Associated Press Posted Jun 5, 2018 7:04 am PDT Last Updated Jun 5, 2018 at 9:00 am PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Emaillast_img read more